Review Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948)

Discussion in 'Universal Monsters' started by Doctor Omega, Mar 4, 2018.

  1. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    22,013
    Likes Received:
    4,441
    • Like Like x 1
    #1 Doctor Omega, Mar 4, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2018
  2. johnnybear

    johnnybear Member: Rank 6

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2017
    Messages:
    1,124
    Likes Received:
    874
    My favourite Abbott & Costello and a fitting end to the great Universal Monsters! It's really weird to find out (which I did many years ago) that Bela Lugosi only played Count Dracula twice! In 1931 in the film of the same name and here in this fun filled cracker!
    JB
     
    • Love it! Love it! x 2
  3. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    22,013
    Likes Received:
    4,441
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    22,013
    Likes Received:
    4,441
    castlefilm03.jpg


    For anyone without an old projector.....


     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    22,013
    Likes Received:
    4,441
    Production notes
    • The film was originally titled The Brain of Frankenstein, but the title was changed during filming to appear like less of a straight horror film and capitalize on Abbott and Costello's marquee value.
    • In a 1996 documentary, 100 Years of Horror, hosted by Christopher Lee, Bela Lugosi, Jr. states that the studio hired additional comedians to add laughs between takes on the set. This is incorrect; one comedian, Bobby Barber, sufficed.
    • Costello hated the script. He said that his five-year-old daughter could have written something better, but later warmed to the film during production.
    • During filming, Glenn Strange found Costello so funny he would often break up laughing, necessitating many retakes (this is readily apparent in the scene where Costello sits on the Monster's lap). There were several pie fights and other horseplay between takes as well, but Abbott and Costello respected the three monsters and made sure no pies or seltzer hit the heavily made-up actors.
    • No indication has been found suggesting Boris Karloff was ever approached to appear in this film, although he did help promote the film and can be seen in several publicity photos, including one where pointing at a poster outside a New York theater. His alleged comment ("As long as I don't have to see it!") has been used to imply he either disliked Abbott & Costello, or was aghast at playing the Monster for laughs. In fact, he had done the latter a year before in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947 film), though the segment was excised. And Karloff appeared with the duo in Abbott and Costello Meet the Killer, Boris Karloff (1949), and in Abbott and Costello Meet Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1953).
    • When the Monster throws Sandra through the lab window, Glenn Strange stepped on a camera cable and fractured his ankle. Lon Chaney Jr., who had previously played the Monster in The Ghost of Frankenstein, took over the role of the Monster for that brief scene. A stuntmen doubled for Strange in some long shots of the fire scenes on the pier.
    • The Australian film board deleted almost every scene involving a monster before the film could be approved for release in that country.
    • This was the only time on film Béla Lugosi officially reprised the role he had created in Dracula (1931). He had previously portrayed vampires or similar caped characters in Mark of the Vampire (1935), Spooks Run Wild, The Return of the Vampire (1943) and Scared to Death (1947) and would do so again in Mother Riley Meets the Vampire (1952) and Plan 9 from Outer Space, as well as a gag cameo as a wax figure of himself as Dracula in a 1933 Hollywood on Parade short, but this was the only other time he played Dracula as a sustained role.

    • Abbott and Costello sidekick Bobby Barber appears in the film as a waiter at the costume ball. Barber was a regular part of the crew of many Abbott and Costello productions. Deleted and backstage footage from the movie catches Costello and Barber in several gags and stunts.
    • The final scene with the Invisible Man presaged Abbott and Costello Meet the Invisible Man (1951), though Price did not star, and all characters were different. However, Vincent Price had appeared in The Invisible Man Returns (1940).
    • This was the fourth Universal film to include Dracula assuming an alias, "Dr. Lajos." The character masquerades as "Count Alucard" in Son of Dracula, as "Baron Latos" in "House of Frankenstein (1944 film)" and "House of Dracula". Coincidentally, Béla Lugosi had a brother named Lajos.
     
    • Love it! Love it! x 2
  6. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    22,013
    Likes Received:
    4,441
    Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein - LIVE EVENT w/Expert Panel



     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    22,013
    Likes Received:
    4,441
    John Landis on ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN




     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. johnnybear

    johnnybear Member: Rank 6

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2017
    Messages:
    1,124
    Likes Received:
    874
    I remember that when the monster threw the vampire nurse threw the window her black knickers were easily viewable! Odd that that wasn't cut in those days! Strange that those days are sort of back with us now with any nudity or sexy shots very heavily frowned upon! :emoji_angry:
    JB
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 8

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    3,314
    Likes Received:
    2,400
    This movie should, in no capacity, work. On any conceivable level. But dammit, it is such a great film. Not only are the monsters awesome, but Abbott and Costello bring their A-game here. Such an enjoyable movie.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  10. johnnybear

    johnnybear Member: Rank 6

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2017
    Messages:
    1,124
    Likes Received:
    874
    The scene where Lou Costello enters Talbot's room after his transformation is very scary and yet funny at the same time!
    JB
     
    • Agree Agree x 1

Share This Page