Review All Things SAM YOUD!

Doctor Omega

Moderator
John_Christopher_01.jpg


Sam Youd (16 April 1922 – 3 February 2012), known professionally as Christopher Samuel Youd, was a British writer, best known for science fiction under the pseudonym John Christopher, including the novels The Death of Grass, The Possessors, and the young-adult novel series The Tripods.

He won the Guardian Prize in 1971 and the Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis in 1976.

Youd also wrote under variations of his own name and under the pseudonyms Stanley Winchester, Hilary Ford, William Godfrey, William Vine, Peter Graaf, Peter Nichols, and Anthony Rye.


Bibliography

Except where stated otherwise, all items listed are novels or novellas published as books.

Christopher's novel The Year of the Comet saw its first U.S. publication in the August 1957 issue of Satellite Science Fiction

Christopher's novella "A World of Slaves" was the cover story on the March 1959 issue of Satellite Science Fiction
John Christopher



 
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Doctor Omega

Moderator
Other pen names he used.....


Christopher Youd
  • The Winter Swan (1949)
Samuel Youd
  • Babel Itself (1951)
  • Brave Conquerors (1952)
  • Crown and Anchor (1953)
  • A Palace of Strangers (1954)
  • Holly Ash (US title The Opportunist, 1955)
  • Giant's Arrow (1956); as Anthony Rye in the UK, Samuel Youd in the US
  • The Choice (UK title The Burning Bird, 1961)
  • Messages of Love (1961)
  • The Summers at Accorn (1963)
William Godfrey
  • Malleson at Melbourne (1956) - a cricket novel, volume 1 of an unfinished trilogy
  • The Friendly Game (1957) - volume 2 of the trilogy
William Vine
  • "Death Sentence" (short story), Imagination Science Fiction, June 1953
  • "Explosion Delayed" (short story), Space Science Fiction, July 1953
Peter Graaf
  • Dust and the Curious Boy (1957); US title, Give the Devil His Due - volume 1 in the Joe Dust series
  • Daughter Fair (1958) - volume 2 in the Joe Dust series
  • The Sapphire Conference (1959) - volume 3 in the Joe Dust series
  • The Gull's Kiss (1962)
Hilary Ford
  • Felix Walking (1958)
  • Felix Running (1959)
  • Bella on the Roof (1965)
  • A Figure in Grey (1973)
  • Sarnia (1974)
  • Castle Malindine (1975)
  • A Bride for Bedivere (1976)
Peter Nichols
  • Patchwork of Death (1965)
Stanley Winchester
  • The Practice (1968)
  • Men With Knives (1968); US title, A Man With a Knife
  • The Helpers (1970)
  • Ten Per Cent of Your Life (1973)
 
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Doctor Omega

Moderator
I think that BIG FINISH should make the third series on audio.

Doubtful if they could get the entire original cast back, but they could recast and finally complete the trilogy.


As for any movie trilogy (which has been in development hell for years), yes, but I have an awful feeling that they would mess it up.

A tv show....?

I am not sure about that.

Wouldn't want to see it cancelled after two series yet again!
 

Doctor Omega

Moderator
I think that BIG FINISH should make the third series on audio.

Doubtful if they could get the entire original cast back, but they could recast and finally complete the trilogy.


As for any movie trilogy (which has been in development hell for years), yes, but I have an awful feeling that they would mess it up.

A tv show....?

I am not sure about that.

Wouldn't want to see it cancelled after two series yet again!

In the latest VORTEX Big Finish magazine, someone asks about an audio version of the third series.

Big Finish explain in reply that Disney now own the rights to THE TRIPODS, so they cannot do it.
 

Doctor Omega

Moderator
Well Disney ain't doing anything with it are they now!
JB

tripods.jpg



This from way back in 2015.....

https://www.alwynash.com/2015/05/the-tripods-where-is-john-christophers.html


There is no doubt that John Christopher's Tripod legacy will be adapted, at some point. And when it does, how will it compare to the original novels? Will Beanpole really be a girl? In an interview with horror website Dread Central, in 2010, writer Hazeldine commented, "Tripods… again, we’re trying to find a studio home for that. We developed that at Paramount and it was put into turnaround. It was originally developed at Disney through many different writers and many different directors. I’d been offered it twice when it was based at Disney, but both times I just couldn’t do it. I’d always really wanted to do it because I adored Tripods as a kid. I read all of the books, watched the BBC show, and I loved it. I used to go sit on the North Downs in Surrey and look out across the English countryside and imagine Tripods walking across the horizon, you know?"

His comment that "We’ve been close a couple of times in the last few months, but we’re still trying to find a studio to do it" should bring hope, though as the years pass, still no sign of those colossal Tripods striding with menace through Mankind's hopes and dreams...

I should also mention, perfect timing, that another of the prolific author's books landed on my doorstep a while back: Empty World. Originally published in 1977, the story focuses on a disease, called the Calcutta Plague (any guesses as to why it is so called?), that inflicts an ageing acceleration on its victims thus killing them. "World" takes a look at life during and after the event, as survivor Neil Miller (a fifteen year old boy) attempts to come to terms with the changing world around him, and the loss that he encounters along the way.

It is good to know that many of John Christipher's works are being republished for a newer audience, including The Tripods, by Simon & Schuster's imprint label Aladdin, though I'm sure older fans will enjoy collecting fresher copies for their bookshelves! Empty World, in particular, is as relevant today as it was when first published, what with the continuing threat of global terrorism, Swine influenza etc.

As for Sam Youd, who passed away in February 2012, thank you for all that you have done - happy memories are the photographs in which we revisit from time to time; and my photograph album is all the richer for the work you have shared.
 
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