Fun Food & Drink

Hunter28

Member: Rank 3
Definitely. It looks incredible.
Here you go.

1 large round loaf, about 10" in diameter
1/2 lb. mortadella
1/2 lb. capicola
1/2 lb. genoa salami
1/2 lb. prosciutto di parma
1/3 lb. provolone
1 jar (16 oz) olive salad (I use Boscoli)
1 jar (7 oz) roasted red peppers, sliced
1 jar (12 oz) marinated artichoke hearts, drained & chopped
1 jar (12 oz) mild banana peppers, sliced

Carefully slice the loaf in half to form a large bun. Scoop out the insides (top and bottom) to make a large cavity for the filling. Begin layering the various meats, cheese, and condiments. It helps to lay everything out assembly line style and layer in order, making sure to get everything evenly distributed. Be sure to use all the meat and cheese, you'll likely have extra condiments (these can be served on the side if you like). Once the loaf has been filled and topped off wrap it tightly in plastic wrap. Put a heavy pan over the top to weigh it down and chill the sandwich for at least 4 hours to let the flavors come together. Unwrap, slice in wedges, and drizzle with balsamic vinegar.
 

ant-mac

Administrator
Staff member
VIP
Here you go.

1 large round loaf, about 10" in diameter
1/2 lb. mortadella
1/2 lb. capicola
1/2 lb. genoa salami
1/2 lb. prosciutto di parma
1/3 lb. provolone
1 jar (16 oz) olive salad (I use Boscoli)
1 jar (7 oz) roasted red peppers, sliced
1 jar (12 oz) marinated artichoke hearts, drained & chopped
1 jar (12 oz) mild banana peppers, sliced

Carefully slice the loaf in half to form a large bun. Scoop out the insides (top and bottom) to make a large cavity for the filling. Begin layering the various meats, cheese, and condiments. It helps to lay everything out assembly line style and layer in order, making sure to get everything evenly distributed. Be sure to use all the meat and cheese, you'll likely have extra condiments (these can be served on the side if you like). Once the loaf has been filled and topped off wrap it tightly in plastic wrap. Put a heavy pan over the top to weigh it down and chill the sandwich for at least 4 hours to let the flavors come together. Unwrap, slice in wedges, and drizzle with balsamic vinegar.
Just reading that gave me heartburn...
 

High Plains Drifter

The Drifter
VIP
Good Foods With Loads Of Iron

For the last year, every month I been forced into seeing the blood b*tch. I can't stand this doctor. I was sent from my doctor to this lady. The reason why I call her the blood b*tch was cause she is very pushy, trying to get me to let them drill into m arm for my bone marrow. The blood doc asked me how I was still functioning normal, since my iron was really low. Every month it's the same thing, go get blood drawn, see the blood doc, repeat next month, and I'm tired of it.

I have low iron, and I am not a fan of iron rich foods like liver. I really, hate anything with liver in it. I have been eating better like spinach pizza, spinach/artichoke hot pockets, spinach/green shakes at Tropical Smoothie, spinach on my subs, anything that can contain spinach and I don't taste it I'm good. I even buy these really good burritos from Wallyworld that contain 20% iron. I still have to take iron pills daily, but I need a break every now and then. Since, my iron problem I read labels looking for good eats with iron.

My question is What other products contain good levels of iron, taste good, & anyone would recommend?
 
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ant-mac

Administrator
Staff member
VIP
There seem to be two types of iron - heme and non-heme.

Spinach is in the non-heme category, along with raw yellow beans, spirulina, falafel, soybean kernels, lentils, treacle, molasses, candied ginger root, toasted sesame seeds and cocoa. I must admit that the falafel, candied ginger root and lentils sound interesting to me.

In the other category, there are clams, pork liver, lamb kidney, cooked oysters, cuttlefish, lamb liver, octopus, mussels, beef liver and beef heart. I've always been a meat lover, but that lot is enough to make me consider becoming a vegetarian...

I wish you luck, Popeye. :emoji_wink:
 

croft_alice

Member: Rank 4
Something new

Hello raiders for all nations!I have a question for you...if i may of course anyway...do you ever consider to give up the life in a city for one of being a farmer?I did and i don't regret it.
 
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Hunter28

Member: Rank 3
Hello raiders for all nations!I have a question for you...if i may of course anyway...do you ever consider to give up the life in a city for one of being a farmer?I did and i don't regret it.
I think I would like farming. I am guessing it is a ton of work but I have always liked working in the outdoors.
 

ant-mac

Administrator
Staff member
VIP
Apparently, I spent the first six weeks of my life on a farm.

I've never felt any urge to go back.

Although I find living in the countryside to be an enjoyable experience - for the most part - I never had any real trouble living in the city either.
 

Doctor Omega

Administrator
Staff member
VIP
Probiotics labelled 'quite useless'

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-45434753


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A group of scientists in Israel claim foods that are packed with good bacteria - called probiotics - are almost useless.

Their study is among the most detailed analyses of what happens when we consume probiotics.

They are seen as healthy and good for the gut, but the results found they had little or no effect inside the body.

The researchers said probiotics of the future would need tailoring to the needs of each individual.

The team at the Weizmann Institute of Science made their own probiotic cocktail using 11 common good bacteria including strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria.

It was given to 25 healthy volunteers for a month.

They were then sedated and samples were surgically taken from multiple places in the stomach and small and large intestines.

The researchers were looking to see where bacteria successfully colonised and whether they led to any changes in the activity of the gut.

The results in the journal Cell, showed in half of cases the good bacteria went in the mouth and straight out the other end.

In the rest, they lingered briefly before being crowded out by our existing microbes.
 

chainsaw_metal1

Member: Rank 8
Something new

Hello raiders for all nations!I have a question for you...if i may of course anyway...do you ever consider to give up the life in a city for one of being a farmer?I did and i don't regret it.
It is not a life for me. I was raised in town (a small rural town, but in town none the less), and I'm more comfortable in a town or city. I like being close to everything I may need. My wife and I rented a farmhouse for a few years when our kids were born, and while I did like some of the privacy (except for the hunters our landlord would let come out, who used to leave carcasses in the woods for our dogs to drag onto the yard and would make noise at night when out kids were trying to sleep), it's a little too quiet. Also, the actual idea of making a living off of farming is too much of a gamble for my liking. I talk with a lot of farmers at work, and years like this year has been, where the weather is so unpredictable, makes me glad I have a job with security. Also, I used to stay overnight with friends who lived on farms, and I don't do well with animals. They're vicious and hate filled.
 

chainsaw_metal1

Member: Rank 8
In the other category, there are clams, pork liver, lamb kidney, cooked oysters, cuttlefish, lamb liver, octopus, mussels, beef liver and beef heart. I've always been a meat lover, but that lot is enough to make me consider becoming a vegetarian...
Mate, there's a lot of good eats in that list. I'm fairly certain that those are at least half of the ingredients needed for haggis.
 
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