Review Geeky Memories: BOOKS!

Discussion in 'Books' started by Doctor Omega, Feb 7, 2017.

  1. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    [​IMG] ThinkstockPhotos-477455399.jpg


    That book meant something to you once....

    Maybe it still does....

    Maybe it's still on your shelf....

    Maybe it's long gone, but you would love a reunion....

    Share it - or your memory of it - here....







     
    #1 Doctor Omega, Feb 7, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2018
  2. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    NINETEEN EIGHTY FOUR by George Orwell.

    Had to read it for O level and ended up loving the book to bits, despite the grim subject matter.

    And more important a read than ever, as time goes by, it seems. :(

    I already knew of the tv play version starring Peter Cushing, so this helped me get into the book, being a fan of his at the time.
     
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  3. streak1981

    streak1981 Member: Rank 3

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    Two or three...

    A Midsummer Night's Dream (Shakespeare)
    The Chocolate War (Robert Cormier)
    To Kill A Mockingbird (Harper Lee)

    All three were for eighth grade English...
     
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  4. DeJoHnNiE

    DeJoHnNiE Member: Rank 4

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    Kruistocht in spijkerbroek (Thea Beckman)

    Het Achterhuis (Anne Frank)

    De Amulet (Simone van der Vlugt)

    These are Dutch books, but the first two are also translated to english. The last one wasn't (all have a clickable link though). I had to read these in School and genuinly ended up loving them and books like that made me read so much that I have no idea how much I've read in 30 something years. When I was still in school I read over a thousand books easily.
     
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  5. ant-mac

    ant-mac Administrator
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    ANIMAL FARM by George Orwell. However, I enjoyed the book thoroughly and I love NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR even more. In fact, the second one is probably my second favourite novel overall.

    THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS by John Wyndham. I came back to it years after I left school and it is now my favourite novel overall.
     
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  6. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    I keep meaning to reread Triffids.

    I also ended up reading Animal Farm during my teens as I was playing Moses the Raven in an amateur theatre production of it at the time, so had a double dose of Orwell at about the same time! Loved Nineteen Eighty Four more, but like both books. I have not read any others of his as of yet.
     
  7. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    I also had to read Rogue Male by Geoffrey Household and ended up enjoying that as well.

    [​IMG]

    I just found it a well written, fast paced book.

    I will have to reread it again!
     
    #7 Doctor Omega, Feb 9, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2017
  8. ant-mac

    ant-mac Administrator
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    I enjoy all of John Wyndham's work.

    I also especially enjoy Arthur C Clarke's work. There are few subjects more attractive to me than intelligent science fiction.
     
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  9. TheSowIsMine

    TheSowIsMine What an excellent day for an exorcism
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    I wasn't forced a lot of books, most of the time you could choose your own, but for english I was forced to read Animal Farm and The Time Machine, and I loved both of them.
     
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  10. ant-mac

    ant-mac Administrator
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    I've read ANIMAL FARM a couple of times, but I've never read THE TIME MACHINE - only THE WAR OF THE WORLDS.
     
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  11. The Seeker

    The Seeker Member: Rank 5

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    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich
    Crime and Punishment
     
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  12. streak1981

    streak1981 Member: Rank 3

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    I forgot to mention one... The Devil's Arithmetic.
     
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  13. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 8

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    You're denying yourself. THE TIME MACHINE is a fantastic read. As is THE WAR OF THE WORLDS.
     
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  14. ant-mac

    ant-mac Administrator
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    I sometimes find the language from that era somewhat... antiquated.

    I find myself paying more attention to its style rather than to its substance.
     
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  15. The Seeker

    The Seeker Member: Rank 5

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    Oh The Time Machine is a hoot, get through the boring talky parts and get to the point when he travels to the future and meets the Eloi. I didn't like the movie btw.
     
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  16. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

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    Lots of love for HG Wells - WAR OF THE WORLDS not only, for me, inspired the best ever concept album not by Rick Wakeman, but the best ever sequel - Willy Rushton's W.G. GRACE'S LAST CASE. No where near as famous as something so funny, rude and clever ought to be. Dr Grace and Dr Watson team up to prevent the return of the martians - Dr Jekyll, Queen Victoria and Oscar Wilde also get involved... ha! modernise that, I dare you Tom Cruise!

    Oh yes, book I was made to read, etc - Jane Austen''s Persuasion was a comic revelation, but I will never forgive Wordsworth for the ruddy Prelude.
     
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  17. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 8

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    There were several books that I was made to read in school that ended up becoming major factors in who I became, and which I loved. All Quiet on the Western Front was a book that I might not have otherwise picked up, but it engrossed me. It's nice to see war from the perspective of the enemy, and give them a human face (much to the chagrin of world leaders). Night was another book that hit me hard, as I had read about the Holocaust, but not from a personal recount. And, of course, Animal Farm is an amazing book.
     
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  18. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    [​IMG]


    Once they were sometimes the only way to re-experience a movie, barring television showings....

    But in this day and age, is there any point to them anymore?

    Should we bid farewell to the novelisations?

    It's not as if any classic literature came from their ranks....

    Or did it?



     
    #18 Doctor Omega, Mar 20, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2017
  19. filmfan95

    filmfan95 Member: Rank 3

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    Novelizations are actually kind of cool, because often times they will be based on an earlier draft of the screenplay than the one used for the final movie, so one can find out what was originally going to be different in a movie. For instance, in the novelization of Back to the Future, Marty actually hides the Delorean inside the garage of what will be his house in the future, rather than behind a billboard. And he actually has the push the Delorean all the way to Doc Brown's house in order to fully convince him that he's telling the truth about being a time traveler. I actually thought these differences were pretty interesting.

    In the novelization of The Karate Kid, the scene where Daniel visits the arcade with his girlfriend comes directly before the day when he finds out that Miyagi has been teaching him karate all along, whereas this scene comes much earlier in the final movie. Also, the beginning scene of Karate Kid 2, where Miyagi beats up the evil karate teacher, was originally intended to be the ending of the first film, and the novelization includes it. These are things that I never would have found out had I never read the novelizations.

    What does get kind of annoying is when there are novelizations of movies that are already based on books. I thought the whole point of a novelization was so that people had a book version of a story that they could read. And if the movie is already based on a book, why can't people just read that one? I only advocate books based on movies based on books if the movie is different enough from the original book that it becomes a different story.

    All in all, I think novelizations of movies still have quite a bit of merit among collectors.
     
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  20. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    When the Alien 3 novelisation came out it had wildly differing passages to the film in the theatres. All very baffling at the time, but now we know just what interference and reshooting went on and we have now seen a lot of those novelised scenes, but it was a fascinating read at the time.
     

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