Elliot Thomas

Member: Rank 3
Hollywood at its biggest, finest and most ambitious, and one of the best examples of storytelling on celluloid; arguably the greatest romance ever presented on screen too.
 

duzit

Member: Rank 6
@Hux
This is a one of a kind film. Storytelling at its best. Rent it, buy it, stream it, whatever it takes, this is "the one" that has to be seen before you leave the viewing area. Take the time, you will not be sorry.:emoji_purple_heart:
 

Doctor Omega

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“Gone with the Wind” Screening Cancelled


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The Orpheum Theatre in Memphis has scrapped plans for a screening of 1939’s “Gone with the Wind” with the cinema’s board deeming the iconic film as “insensitive”.

Over the years, the Civil War and Reconstruction-era set ‘Wind’ has been heavily criticised for being sympathetic towards the South and depicting certain racial stereotypes.

The film was screened at the cinema earlier this month ahead of plans to include it in their Summer film series next year. The retrospective line-up for the Summer is normally announced in the Spring, but in a statement issued by The Orpheum Theatre Group this week they say:

“While title selections for the series are typically made in the spring of each year, the Orpheum has made this determination early in response to specific inquiries from patrons.

The Orpheum appreciates feedback on its programming from all members of the Mid-South community. The recent screening of Gone With The Wind at the Orpheum on Friday, August 11th 2017 generated numerous comments.

The Orpheum carefully reviewed all of them. As an organisation whose stated mission is to ‘entertain, educate and enlighten the communities it serves’, the Orpheum cannot show a film that is insensitive to a large segment of its local population.”

People have now taken to the original event’s Facebook page with reactions proving polarising. Upon its release, “Gone With The Wind” won eight Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Supporting Actress.
 

Doctor Omega

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A manipulative woman and a roguish man conduct a turbulent romance during the American Civil War and Reconstruction periods.
 
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Doctor Omega

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Fire Over England (aka Gloriana) is a 1937 London Film Productions film drama, notable for providing the first pairing of Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh. It was directed by William K. Howard and written by Clemence Dane from the novel Fire Over England by A. E. W. Mason. Leigh's performance in the film helped to convince David O. Selznick to cast her as Scarlett O'Hara in his production of Gone with the Wind. The film is an historical drama set during the reign of Elizabeth I focusing on England's victory over the Spanish Armada





 

The Seeker

Member: Rank 6
The book was dreadfully racist. Margaret Mitchell was a good writer and a feminist (of sorts) but her attitudes towards black people were so backward, and the way she portrayed the KKK as being heroic - they had to rework that novel a lot to get it on film.

Clark Gable was part black and part Native American, which makes the casting kind of curious. The only thing I didn't like about his performance was that he was directed to speak with a northern accent. In the book Rhett Butler had a "drawl." What, a southern accent isn't sexy?

Vivian Leigh was superb.
 

Doctor Omega

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