Review Let's Talk about COMICS!

Discussion in 'Comics: General' started by chainsaw_metal1, Feb 6, 2017.

  1. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

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    Share your comic-reading memories of the Mekon here......



     
    #21 Doctor Omega, Apr 12, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017
  2. Doctor Omega

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    Action was a controversial weekly British anthology comic that was published by IPC Magazines, starting on 14 February 1976.

    Concerns over the comic's violent content saw it withdrawn from sale on 16 October 1976. It reappeared the following month, in toned-down form, and continued publication until 12 November 1977, at which point it was merged with Battle Picture Weekly. Despite its short lifespan, Action was highly influential on the British comics scene, and was a direct forerunner of the long-running 2000 AD.

    The comic was devised in 1975 by freelance writer/editor Pat Mills, at the request of publishing house IPC. It was intended to reflect the changing social and political times of the late 1970s, and to compete with DC Thomson's war-themed Warlord title. The comic was briefly to have been called Action 76, with the title incrementing each year, until it was named simply Action.

    Many of the stories in Action were what Mills called "dead cribs", essentially rip-offs of popular films, books, and comic heroes.

    The first issue was published on 7 February 1976, with a cover date of 14 February 1976. The comic was instantly popular, particularly for its gritty tone and graphic gore.

    Within weeks the media had picked up on the title's violent content. The London Evening Standard and The Sun ran major articles on the comic, with the latter echoing the Victorian "penny dreadful" by dubbing Action "the sevenpenny nightmare" (the cover price was 7p).

    Over the next few months Action was the centre of a campaign led by Mary Whitehouse, of the National Viewers and Listeners Association, to censor or ban the comic. IPC eventually started to moderate strips to forestall possible boycotts by newsagent chains such as W.H. Smith.

    In September 1976 John Sanders appeared on the television programme Nationwide, where he tried to defend the comic from a vigorous attack by interviewer Frank Bough.

    Pressure within IPC's higher management, and alleged worries that the two major newsagent chains, W.H. Smith and John Menzies, would refuse to stock not just Action, but all of IPC's line, led to the 23 October issue being pulped.

    The title returned on 27 November (cover date 4 December), but the violence was toned down, and the previous sense of anarchism was replaced by a safer, blander feel.

    Sales dropped drastically, and the last issue before merging with Battle was published on 5 November 1977 – dated 11 November.


    Major stories
    • Hook Jaw was created by Mills as a Jaws cash-in and the flagship title of the comic. The strip was scripted by Ken Armstrong and drawn by Ramon Sola. Hook Jaw is a Great White Shark and the hero of the series, even though he spends most of his time eating most of the human cast of characters. The name Hook Jaw comes from the gaff hook stuck in the shark's jaw after some fisherman tried to catch the creature shortly before being eaten by it. Mills gave the strip an environmental edge by having Hook Jaw eat corrupt humans, or criminals, seeking to exploit the seas, as well as anyone else unlucky enough to get near him. Hook Jaw appeared in three stories before the ban. The first was set on an oil rig, the second was set on an island resort in the Caribbean, and the third was set just off the south coast of England. Hook Jaw returned after the ban, but no longer ate as many people and if he did it was off panel. The strip also lost the environmental themes Mills had placed in it.
    • BlackJack was created by John Wagner, with art by Trigo. It told the story of Jack Barron, a boxer who fights to help poor kids knowing that he runs the risk of going blind. The strip was accused of being racist even though it was one of the first times a black character was the hero of a British Comic strip
    • Death Game 1999 was written by Tom Tully. The series was a cash-in on the success of Rollerball and dealt with a lethal future sport played by condemned prisoners. Art was provided by Costa, Ian Gibson (2 pages) and Massimo Bellardinelli among others (John Stokes). The strip was almost as popular as Hook Jaw. After the relaunch Death Game 1999 became Spinball, and turned into a formulaic adventure strip without the ambiguities which featured in the original.
    • Kids Rule OK was written by Jack Adrian with art by Mike White; this series drew most criticism. London, 1986: A plague has wiped out the adult population, with the result that violent gangs of children run riot. The strip was instantly controversial with its heavy anti-authoritarian tone and extreme violence. The strip never survived the ban; two episodes were destroyed by IPC entirely, whilst those that did survive were heavily edited. A full version of the story, with a text insert to cover the missing episodes, can be found in Action – The Story of a Violent Comic.
    • Hellman of Hammer Force, written by Gerry Finley-Day, was the story of a German Panzer major. It established a pattern followed by 2000 AD for having unconventional or unsympathetic characters as the hero. The strip returned after the ban, but stripped of its politics became a conventional war adventure story.
    • Dredger was a tough Dirty Harry–type agent. The strip was popular due to its increasingly bizarre and violent action scenes. The strip survived the ban, but like the others became a conventional adventure strip.
    • Look Out For Lefty was an unconventional football strip based on the adventures of Kenny Lampton, a working-class teenager whose powerful left foot gave him the nickname of "Lefty". It was unlike any other football strips in British boys' comics at the time because the strip would include football hooliganism, as well as Lefty's not always being a clean-cut hero. The violence on display in the strip mirrored the real-life football violence taking place at the time, most notably during a game between Aston Villa and Rangers. After the ban, the strip became a conventional Roy of the Rovers–type strip and removed any hint of controversy.

     
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  3. Doctor Omega

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    Garth was a comic strip in the British newspaper Daily Mirror from July 24, 1943, to March 22, 1997. The strip belonged to the action-adventure genre and recounted the exploits of the title character, an immensely strong hero who battled various villains throughout the world and many different chronological eras.[1] Garth was widely syndicated throughout English-speaking countries during its long run. The 1960s Australian fast bowler Garth McKenzie was nicknamed after the comic strip hero.

    Steve Dowling and Gordon Boshell were the originators of the Garth character. Dowling wanted to create a British adventure comic strip, and took inspiration from the American comic strips Superman,[2] Flash Gordon and Terry and the Pirates.[3] Dowling and Boshell took on 15-year-old John Allard to work on Garth, who stayed with the strip for its entire lifetime. After 59 adventures Dowling retired and handed Garth over to Allard, which he carried on until 1971 when Eagle comics' Dan Dare artist, Frank Bellamy, took over the art with Allard writing the scripts.[1] Garth's longevity had been established by Don Freeman, who created almost every basic Garth plot on which the saga was built. Peter O'Donnell, Jim Edgar and Angus Allan also wrote extensively for the strip during its decades-long existence. Philip Harbottle is a leading Garth expert and collector of the strips, and he wrote several of the stories during the 1990s. Martin Asbury became Garth's artist after Frank Bellamy's death in 1976, drawing the strip and writing many of the stories until its final episode in 1997.

    In 1993, Bill Storrie produced perhaps a dozen or so 60-page photocopied magazines titled The Gopherville Argus Special Edition No. 1 featuring Garth as a tribute to the writers and artists who had been involved with the strip. Most if not all Garth strips are now owned by Mirror.

    As of Wednesday 13 August 2008, "Garth" has reappeared on the website of the Daily Mirror, drawn by the artist Huw J. Davies. ( aka HuwJ & currently HuwJ Matsumura )[4]

    The Online Strip, was a Successful re- Visiting / Re-Imagineering of the character, Taking him back to the Pre-Steve Dowling Origins and Establishing him in a Historical Setting.

    Having successfully worked in the Media Entertainment industry and Printed Media for over 3 decades ( Including Periods at Disney Warner and Fox ) Huw J believed that the Re Imagined version could easily cross from the Digital, back to the Printed medium, and Ultimately licensing to other media. This was Discussed and the future of the character in print was agreed upon. with a new ongoing Daily strip in print being Planned to run at the end of the 2nd Online story arc, King of New York. ( which also established the reasons behind the Characters Dislike for Guns)

    However, due to an untimely accident involving Long standing cartoon editor Ken Layson, with who the agreement had been made things became muddied and internal politics with the Mirrorpix licensing arm of the newspaper created issues that delayed and inevitably halted this decision.

    HuwJ decided to honor the characters History, and under the terms of his License re-branded the character tipping the hat to Don Freeman longtime writer of the strip by Giving Garth a Surname, the Graphic Novel Titled Captain Garth Freeman of the Armed Services and in 2010 was launched initially under British Publisher Markosia, and was a success! Selling out both at Specialist Comic Stores and Conventions, as well as Online. it was re-Published in 2013 By Pummie Productions ink, At first in its usual format and (also in 2013) with a New Cover by Spider-Man Artist and Stan Lee Collaborator Andy Tong it was repackaged with the Garth Title in Honor of the 70th Anniversary of the character with all proceeds going to Help for Heroes.

    In 2015, Published again by Pummie Productions ink, the character Starred Alongside Sexton Blake, in the 1st of what is promised to be a series of Comic books, under the Captain Garth Freeman of the Armed Services title. this again sold out and if the team continues to publish the Comic it will be collected in a bumper edition after the 5th book.

    HuwJ Believes that the online revamp of the character was the catalyst that got the longtime fans of the character to push for a return of the hero and what ultimately led the Newspaper and its Licensing arm to re-color the old strips and re launch them in the paper[5]

    Garth started a run of reprints in the Daily Mirror coloured by Martin Baines in the issue dated Monday 21 February 2011. and continues at present, the strip and the character are a testament to the longevity of good solid storytelling and characters with robust ideals. and looks to still have a promising future

    Characters and story[edit]
    Garth's time-travelling adventures lasted for over 50 years and covered 165 stories (plus two additional stories published in the Daily Mirror Book for Boys, 1970–71). In the backstory, Garth washed ashore in Shetland and was adopted by an elderly couple.[1] Garth developed almost superhuman strength and eventually became a naval captain and all-round military genius.[3] Garth travelled through many eras and confronted villains such as Madame Voss and Apollo. His true love was the ancient goddess-like figure, Astra. Garth's sidekick and mentor was Professor Lumiere, who psychoanalyzed the hero and recovered memories of his previous experiences.


     
  4. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 7

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    Looks interesting. I'll have to keep an eye out.
     
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  5. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

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    Starlord was a short-lived weekly British science fiction comic book magazine published by IPC in 1978 as a sister title to 2000 AD, which had been launched the previous year in anticipation of a science fiction boom surrounding Star Wars.

    Starlord was planned as a fortnightly title for older readers, with longer stories and higher production values than 2000 AD and the rest of the IPC boys' comics stable, but this proved too ambitious. Episodes were shortened, the number of colour pages was reduced, although the better quality paper and printing were retained, and Starlord was published weekly at a higher cover price than 2000 AD.

    Stories included:

    • Strontium Dog, a series about a mutant bounty hunter created by writer John Wagner and artist Carlos Ezquerra.
    • Ro-Busters, a robot disaster squad created by writer Pat Mills and artist Kevin O'Neill, although it was more usually drawn by Carlos Pino or Dave Gibbons.
    • Mind Wars, a series about two psychic teenagers in the middle of a galactic war, written by Alan Hebden and drawn by Jesus Redondo (concluded in #22, but briefly returned for a sequel in the 1981 Starlord Annual)
    • Timequake, featuring a tramp steamer skipper reluctantly recruited into Time Control, an agency which fought to prevent anyone tampering with time.
    • Planet of the Damned, a passenger jet vanishes in the Bermuda Triangle and the passengers find themselves on a hostile alien world. Written by Pat Mills (as RE Wright).
    • Holocaust, Carl Hunter, a private detective, discovers a government cover-up of an alien invasion. Written by Alan Hebden.
    Publications
    As well as 22 regular issues there were also three Annuals dated 1980–1982 (though each published at the end of the previous year) and one Summer Special.

    Merger
    IPC found that publishing two weekly science fiction titles split the market, and Starlord, with its higher cover price, was cancelled after 22 issues and merged with 2000 AD in "prog" (issue) 86 of that title. Its last issue was dated 7 October 1978. Starlord was actually the better selling of the two titles, the decision to end it being dictated by the higher production costs of Starlord as opposed to 2000 AD's cheap newsprint format. 2000 AD's line-up was strengthened by the merger: Strontium Dog became one of its most popular and long-running series; and Ro-Busters continued on in 2000 AD for a while and led to an enduring spin-off, ABC Warriors, which still features today. Timequake also briefly featured in issues 148 to 151.

    Collected editions
    Some of the stories, those that carried on into 2000 AD, have been collected by Rebellion Developments into trade paperbacks:

    Editor
    Starlord was edited by Kelvin Gosnell, who was also editor of 2000 AD, although he mostly concentrated on Starlord and left 2000 AD to assistant editor Nick Landau. After Starlord merged with 2000 AD, Gosnell became editor of new comic Tornado.

    Like 2000 AD, Tornado and Scream!, Starlord had a fictional editor, a bouffant-haired superhero also called Starlord, and each issue was supposed to be a primer for survival in the galaxy. When the title was cancelled and merged with 2000 AD, Starlord announced that his mission on Earth had been successfully completed and he was off to battle the evil Interstellar Federation on other worlds, though he urged his readers to "keep watching the stars" (his catchphrase). When a 2000 AD reader asked after Starlord's whereabouts in a 1999 issue though, 2000 AD editor Tharg claimed that "While Starlord has not been sighted on Earth since 1979, rumours that he was seen in a McDonalds in Basingstoke cannot be entirely discounted". On another occasion, it was claimed that he was "out in the Rakkalian Cluster, singing lead soprano with an Alvin Stardust tribute band".


    All of the Star Lord covers can be seen from 45 seconds into the following video......



     
  6. Doctor Omega

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    Story index
    Planet Of The Damned
    Issues: 1-10
    Episodes: 10
    Pages: 49
    Script: R. E. Wright
    Art: Lalia 1; Pena 2, 5, 6, 8, 10; Azpiri 3, 4, 7, 9
    Cover dates: 13/5/78 to 15/7/78

    Timequake
    First story
    Issues: 1-3
    Episodes: 3
    Pages: 18
    Script: Jack Adrian
    Art: Ian Kennedy 1, 3; John Cooper 2
    Dated: 13/5/78 to 27/5/78

    Second story
    Issues: 4-9
    Episodes: 6
    Pages: 36
    Script: Jack Adrian
    Art: Magellanes Salinas
    Dated: 3/6/78 to 8/7/78

    Third story
    Issues: 10-13
    Episodes: 4
    Pages: 28
    Script: Ian Mennell
    Art: Magellanes Salinas
    Dated: 15/7/78 to 5/8/78

    Strontium Dog
    Max Quirxx
    Issues: 1-2
    Episodes: 2
    Pages: 10
    Script: John Wagner
    Art: Carlos Ezquerra
    Dated: 13/5/78 to 20/5/78

    Papa Por-ka
    Issues: 3-5
    Episodes: 3
    Pages: 15
    Script: John Wagner
    Art: Carlos Ezquerra
    Dated: 27/5/78 to 10/6/78

    No Cure For Kansyr
    Issues: 6-7
    Episodes: 2
    Pages: 10
    Script: John Wagner
    Art: Carlos Ezquerra
    Dated: 17/6/78 to 24/6/78

    Planet Of The Dead
    Issues: 8-10
    Episodes: 3
    Pages: 15
    Script: John Wagner
    Art: Carlos Ezquerra
    Dated: 1/7/78 to 15/7/78

    Two-Faced Terror!
    Issues: 12-15
    Episodes: 4
    Pages: 23
    Script: John Wagner
    Art: Carlos Ezquerra
    Dated: 29/7/78 to 19/8/78

    Demon Maker
    Issues: 17-19
    Episodes: 3
    Pages: 15
    Script: John Wagner
    Art: Brendan McCarthy 1; Ian Gibson 2-3
    Dated: 2/9/78 to 16/9/78

    The Ultimate Weapon
    Issues: 21-22
    Episodes: 2
    Pages: 10
    Script: John Wagner
    Art: Carlos Ezquerra
    Dated: 30/9/78 to 7/10/78

    Ro-Busters
    First story
    Issue: 1
    Episodes: 1
    Pages: 11
    Script: Pat Mills
    Art: Carlos Pino
    Dated: 13/5/78

    Second story
    Issues: 2-4
    Episodes: 3
    Pages: 18
    Script: Pat Mills
    Art: Carlos Pino
    Dated: 20/5/78 to 3/6/78

    Third story
    Issues: 5-6
    Episodes: 2
    Pages: 10
    Script: Bill Henry
    Art: Ian Kennedy
    Dated: 10/6/78 to 17/6/78

    Fourth story
    Issues: 7-12
    Episodes: 6
    Pages: 38
    Script: Pat Mills
    Art: Carlos Pino
    Dated: 24/6/78 to 29/7/78

    Fifth story
    Issues: 13-14
    Episodes: 2
    Pages: 14
    Script: V. Gross
    Art: Ian Kennedy
    Dated: 5/8/78 to 12/8/78

    Sixth story
    Issues: 15-19
    Episodes: 5
    Pages: 34
    Script: Jack Adrian
    Art: Carlos Pino 1, 3, 5; Ferrer 2, 4
    Dated: 19/8/78 to 16/9/78

    Seventh story
    Issues: 20-22
    Episodes: 3
    Pages: 23
    Script: Jack Adrian
    Art: Ferrer 1, 3; Carlos Pino 2
    Dated: 23/9/78 to 7/10/78

    Mind Wars
    Issues: 2-22
    Episodes: 22
    Pages: 129
    Script: Alan Hebden
    Art: Jesus Redondo
    Dated: 20/5/78 to 7/10/78

    Good Morning, Sheldon, I Love You!
    Issue: 11
    Episodes: 1
    Pages: 6
    Script: John Wagner
    Art: Casanovas
    Dated: 22/7/78

    Holocaust
    Issues: 14-22
    Episodes: 9
    Pages: 69
    Script: Alan Hebden
    Art: Lalia 1-4; unknown artist 5, 8-9;
    Madigllianes 6; Luis 7
    Dated: 12/8/78 to 7/10/78

    Earn Big Money While You Sleep!
    Issue: 16
    Episodes: 1
    Pages: 6
    Script: Alan Grant and John Wagner
    Art: Casanovas
    Dated: 26/8/78

    The Snatch
    Issue: 17
    Episodes: 1
    Pages: 3
    Script: Alan Hebden
    Art: Pena
    Dated: 2/9/78

    Skirmish!
    Issue: 20
    Episodes: 1
    Pages: 5
    Script: Alan Hebden
    Art: Pena
    Dated: 23/9/78
     
  7. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

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    Tornado was a short-lived weekly British comic book magazine published for 22 issues by IPC Magazines between March 1979[1] and August 1979. After the cancellations of the Starlord and Action titles, IPC launched Tornado as a way to use up stories already commissioned for the other titles. Like Action it was a mixed title featuring War, Detective, Horror and Science Fiction stories. Its first editor was Kelvin Gosnell. Tornado was printed on the low quality newsprint stock used by 2000 AD and also had five stories of 5 to 6 pages per issue. The title also had a 'superpowered' editor, like Tharg, 'Big E' who was portrayed in photo-strips by a rather portly Dave Gibbons.


    Stories
    Main stories were:

    • The Mind of Wolfie Smith written by Tom Tully, with art by Vincente Vaño, was the story of a young boy whose telepathic and telekinetic powers suddenly emerge, leading him to become a runaway.
    • "Angry Planet" written by Alan Hebden, with art by Massimo Belardinelli, was set in the late 21st century on a Mars that had been made habitable by humans. The story told of the struggle of the first generation of genetic 'martians' to free themselves from exploitation by Earth.
    • "Wagner's Walk" was a WW2 story much in the Action style as the hero is an escaped German POW fleeing the Red Army.
    • "Blackhawk", written by Gerry Finley-Day with art by Alfonso Azpiri, was the story of a Nubian Galley slave who rescues his ship from pirates. Granted his freedom and a commission as a Centurion, Hawk forms his own legion out of other slaves who are then treated as a type of "Dirty Dozen".
    • "Victor Drago" was a pseudonymous revival of Sexton Blake, IPC's long-running fearless detective, written by Bill Henry with art by Mike Dorey.

    Merger
    Tornado was merged with 2000 AD (at the time titled 2000 AD and Starlord, from a previous merger) with the latter's 127th issue. The only characters to transfer were Blackhawk, Wolfie Smith and Captain Klep, the star of a one-page comedy strip. Both Blackhawk and Wolfie Smith had their storylines considerably modified to more closely fit the sci-fi tone of 2000 AD. Blackhawk was kidnapped by aliens and forced to compete in an outer space gladiators' arena, and Wolfie Smith was menaced by an ancient force under a stone circle. By September 1980, 2000 AD had finished presenting stories with the Tornado characters.



    All of the Tornado covers can be found from 1:20 in the following video.....



     
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  8. Doctor Omega

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    Eagle was a seminal British children's British comics periodical, first published from 1950 to 1969, and then in a relaunched format from 1982 to 1994. It was founded by Marcus Morris, an Anglican vicar from Lancashire. Morris edited a Southport parish magazine called The Anvil, but felt that the church was not communicating its message effectively. Simultaneously disillusioned with contemporary children's literature, he and Anvil artist Frank Hampson created a dummy comic based on Christian values. Morris solicited the idea to several Fleet Street publishers, with little success, until Hulton Press took it on.

    Following a huge publicity campaign, the first issue of Eagle was released in April 1950. Revolutionary in its presentation and content, it was enormously successful; the first issue sold about 900,000 copies. Featured in colour on the front cover was its most recognisable story, Dan Dare, Pilot of the Future, created by Hampson with meticulous attention to detail. Other popular stories included Riders of the Range and P.C. 49. Eagle also contained news and sport sections, and educational cutaway diagrams of sophisticated machinery. A members club was created, and a range of related merchandise was licensed for sale.

    Amidst a takeover of the periodical's publisher and a series of acrimonious disputes, Morris left in 1959; Hampson followed shortly thereafter. Although Eagle continued in various forms, a perceived lowering of editorial standards preceded plummeting sales, and it was eventually subsumed by its rival, Lion, in 1969.


    Hampson was embittered by his departure from Eagle.

    Although he created Dan Dare, he and Morris had signed contracts which made the space adventurer the copyright of its publisher.

    This made it difficult for him to get hold of his original artwork, and excluded him from any profits Hulton made from the huge range of Dan Dare and Eagle merchandise it licensed.

    He called Odhams, the comic's owner after 1960, "Treens".

    Hampson later worked on various advertising commissions, and illustrated seven Ladybird books. He recovered from cancer to become a graphics technician at Ewell Technical College, and in 1975 at the Lucca comics convention was declared as the best writer and illustrator of strip cartoons since the end of the Second World War.

    At the 1976 Comics 101 British comics convention he was given the Ally Sloper Award, as the best British strip cartoon artist.

    He died at Epsom in July 1985.

    His original Dan Dare drawings now command high prices, and have inspired a range of modern artists;

    Gerald Scarfe and David Hockney were first published in Eagle.

    X-Men comic scriptwriter Chris Claremont read and enjoyed Eagle, and cites Hampson's work as influential on his career.

    Watchmen co-creator Dave Gibbons has also praised Hampson's work, and the author Tim Rice, in his foreword to Living with Eagles (1998), cites the stories printed in Eagle as helping "me in my story-telling efforts through musicals many years on."

    Professor Stephen Hawking, when asked about the influence Dan Dare had on him, replied: "Why am I in cosmology?", and the entertainer Kenny Everett chose an Eagle Annual as his book on Desert Island Discs.[74]

    The comic industry's Eagle Awards, first presented in the late 1970s, are named after Eagle,[75] and a fan club, the Eagle Society, regularly publishes the quarterly Eagle Times.[76]

    Eagle
    was relaunched in 1982 and ran for over 500 issues before being dropped by its publisher in 1994.


     
    #28 Doctor Omega, Apr 13, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
  9. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

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    A modified Dan Dare was briefly featured in IPC Media's 2000 AD (1977–1979).

    https://www.imdforums.com/threads/2000ad-1977.192/

    https://www.imdforums.com/threads/dan-dare-1950.2031/

    The public reaction to this, along with news of a planned television series, persuaded IPC's comic arm Fleetway to relaunch Eagle in 1982, as a weekly pulp comic.

    The original Dan Dare was no longer a feature of the comic, his eponymous great-great grandson taking on the mantle of space explorer instead.

    Drawn by Gerry Embleton, and later Ian Kennedy, and set 200 years after the original story, the first story-arc featured the return of Dan Dare's earliest nemesis, The Mekon.

    IPC were unable to recreate the popularity of the original strip, and in 1989 the original Dan Dare returned to the comic, in a six-part story illustrated by original Eagle artist Keith Watson.

    In an attempt to emulate the success that Fleetway had had with girls' magazines, the relaunched Eagle initially contained a large number of photo stories such as Doomlord, Sgt. Streetwise and Manix, but this style was soon replaced by the more traditional comic-strip format.

    Along with IPC's entire comics line, Eagle was sold to Robert Maxwell in 1987.

    Although not as successful as its predecessor, over 500 issues were published. A change to a monthly anthology caused by falling sales was a portent of the comic's future. Toward the end of its life issues contained reprints of earlier work, alongside new Dan Dare stories written by Tom Tully and illustrated by David Pugh. The relaunched Eagle was dropped in 1994.


    The original Eagle Comic can be found here.....


    https://www.imdforums.com/threads/eagle-comic-1950-69.2094/



     
  10. Doctor Omega

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    Scream! was a British weekly horror comic anthology that was published for 15 issues by IPC Magazines in 1984.

    Controversy over horror comics had led to the introduction of the Children and Young Persons (Harmful Publications) Act 1955, under which the first prosecution occurred in 1970.

    The editorial approach to Scream! was to de-emphasise the horror label and deliberately not repeat the style of its more controversial precursors, making it more tongue-in-cheek for younger readers, as evidenced by its coverline "not for the nervous".


    Stories included:

    • Fiends and Neighbours - a reprint from a more mainstream IPC comic Cor!!, about a family of monsters living next door to an ordinary couple
    • Monster - serial about a deformed man ('Uncle Terry') who grew up locked in an attic, similar to the Monster of Glamis. The strip borrowed from the 'gentle monster on the run' archetype as espoused by the Hulk, as Terry inevitably escaped, tending to murder people he didn't like due to his inhuman strength and lack of social restraint. Notably the script for the first instalment was credited to Alan Moore, with subsequent scripts credited to "Rick Clark," a pseudonym of John Wagner. After Scream! closed Monster continued in Eagle for some years.
    • The Nightcomers - about a haunted house which killed a husband-and-wife investigator team - their children were drawn to the house to continue the investigation.
    • Terror of the Cats - an ill-fated experiment to harness the psychic energy of cats resulted in local cats becoming enraged and attacking people in a small town. This too was written by Simon Furman.
    • The Thirteenth Floor - Scream!'s most popular strip, concerning "Max" a crazed computer, in charge of an elevator in an apartment building - when someone bad or evil steps inside, "Max" would take them to The Thirteenth Floor as punishment. It continued in Eagle for several years after the demise of Scream!. The first 11 episodes were reprinted in Hibernia Books' 2007 collection, 'The Thirteenth Floor'.

    Editor
    Scream! was edited by Barrie Tomlinson, Ian Rimmer and Simon Furman but in the tradition of counterparts such as 2000 AD and Tornado it was claimed to be edited by its fictional host, Ghastly McNasty.

    Rimmer claims to have taken inspiration for the name Ghastly McNasty from a Liverpool band called Filthy McNasty.

    Ghastly's face was concealed by a hood, and a regular feature of the comic involved readers sending in drawings of what they believed he looked like.


    Cancellation
    Despite fan speculation that Scream! was cancelled due to complaints from the public the reason it, along with five other IPC titles, ceased publication was in response to an industrial dispute.

    It subsequently merged with Eagle to form Eagle and Scream!, in which the series Monster and The Thirteenth Floor were continued.

    There were also six seasonal specials released, mostly consisting of reprints of horror-themed stories from IPC's back catalogue.



     
  11. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 7

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    There was a story in (I think) House of Mystery (if that's wrong, someone let me know, because I'd love to re-read this story). It dealt with a man with a gambling problem who is talked into participating in a game of death essentially. He and several other men (or maybe just one other) are put inside a pinball machine (I don't remember if they were shrunk down or if it was a giant machine), and the main character ends up winning by killing someone else. For his efforts he is handed a one dollar bill, which will bring much reward if used. he scoffs at it, but takes the bill. His wife/girlfriend asks if he's going to gamble it, to which he says he's learned his lesson, and he tosses it into a bell ringer's kettle, but it multiplies into hundreds of dollars, to the surprise of the bell ringer.
     
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  12. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 7

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    The first Saturday of May is designated as Free Comic Book Day, where many publishers put out a book for free, which you can pick up at participating comic shops. Many stores will have events going on with this, like cosplayers for photos, guest artists, special deals, and contests. Many bigger stores may have writers and artists from the major publishers. If you have a LCS that is a participator, I highly suggest you check it out!

    http://www.freecomicbookday.com/
     
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  13. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

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    I can't remember the details of what was inside this one, but the cover never left my memory.

    Like yourself, with your story, I would love to read this one again.....

    745983.jpg
     
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  14. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 7

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    That's awesome! I was just watching a video from a guy who does videos about Charleton Comic, and he had some issues of Baron Weirwulf's Haunted Library. I had never heard of this title before, but I'm going to look for some tomorrow. If I find this one, we'll have to maybe work something out where I can send it to you. After I read it, of course. :emoji_alien:
     
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  15. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 7

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    Update: They had a few issues of Baron Weirwulf, but not the one you were looking for, and I wasn't paying $20 a pop for the others. I did find some other Charleton horror comics in a $2 box, and they were buy one get one free. So score there.

    And talk about temptation! They had a Marvel Star Wars issue one graded at 9.5 for $300! Oh, if only my kids didn't need to eat.
     
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  16. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

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    Thanks for looking anyway CSM. Much appreciated. :emoji_alien:
     
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  17. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 7

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    Always glad to help out.

    I know I mentioned it in one of the Star Trek threads, but there was the 20th anniversary issue of DC's Star Trek run where the young Kirk & crew meet the older versions of themselves. Great story, but released before The Voyage Home was released, and so the crew was stationed on Excelsior. Made no sense once the film came out.
     
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  18. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

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    Yes, I also remember being appalled when DC killed off all of their characters such as Bearclaw, both in order to fit into the forthcoming film continuity and owing to some edict, probably from Richard Arnold, Rodenberry's right hand Trek man, who got sacked as soon as Rodenberry passed away.

    Arnold had a stranglehold over the novels too. None of the characters were allowed to do much of anything of interest.
     
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  19. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 7

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    Again, that's why I liked the fact that my favorite franchises did well in comics, but I got frustrated reading them because so much of it would be retconned with every new movie/series. Star Wars and Star Trek, while having great writers and some really good stories, would set things up, just to have to change everything at the drop of a hat because nothing made sense.

    I guess when Disney decided to relegate the EU to legends status, it brought it all back up. Like, here are these good stories, all licensed by Lucasfilm and considered canon, and now it's not. But, there was also a lot that was crap, so it's not all bad.
     
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  20. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 7

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    I suddenly remembered another story from a horror comic. It was about a young aristocrat who got a yearly stipend. It was finally decided that he would get paid his weight in gold, so he decided to gorge himself to gain more weight. He went from a buff young man to a very heavy person. The time of the weighing had come up, and he decided he wasn't heavy enough, so he decided to swallow musket shot. On the way to be weighed, his carriage driver was going too fast, and had to abruptly stop to avoid an accident. When the carriage was opened, the villagers saw that the musket shot had ripped through his body (of course, you couldn't actually see the body, but it was enough to scar me as a kid).

    Also, while watching a video on YouTube, I was reminded of this really great cover. It freaked me out as a kid. It seems to me the story revolved around the fact that the kid was scared of the uncle because he was the only one that saw him as a demon. When everyone else found out, they kicked him out. As he's walking away, the kid chases after him, and you see that he's a demon too, and he hugs his uncle, willing to go off with him.

    [​IMG]
     
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    #40 chainsaw_metal1, May 6, 2017
    Last edited: May 7, 2017

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