Review Rare and Obscure Movies and Shows You Want to See

Discussion in 'Trivia: Best & Worst' started by CoriSCapnSkip, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. CoriSCapnSkip

    CoriSCapnSkip Member: Rank 1

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    In the Land of the Setting Sun (1919), a lost silent historical shot around Portland, Oregon. A script and stills exist which would cost a mint to have copied from the Library of Congress. Maybe nowadays with digital scanning not so bad as in past times. If ANY footage turns up, I would be DELIGHTED. Ditto the epic serial The Oregon Trail (1923). If any of this still exists, it isn't the episode I want. (For all I know, these things have been discovered since I asked and no one told me, which I wouldn't put past some people.) Silent films are still uncovered when renovating old theaters and cleaning out collector's vaults. The first full-length drama shot in America even turned up under some dude's bed a few years back.

    Carolina, a Shirley Temple Civil War drama with Lionel Barrymore, (before The Little Colonel,) Robert Young, (before Stowaway,) and Delmar Watson, (before Heidi.) Shirley's acquaintance with Delmar from this film prompted her to choose him as Peter in Heidi. Robert Young also claimed it was during this film, and not The Little Colonel, where Barrymore went after Shirley with violent intent when she remarked on his forgetting lines. Young said he was the one who grabbed Shirley before Barrymore could inflict serious harm. This film was long said to be lost, but I have since learned two copies are in existence but are being suppressed due to some racially offensive material. Run it with a disclaimer and suck it up, snowflakes! Perhaps I should tell TCM this--it's what they did with the first episode of the Walt Disney TV show.

    Since 1992 I have been trying to watch as much of Dean Stockwell's work as possible and have viewed vehicles from the sublime to the truly awful. I am particularly interested in anything from 1945 - 1975 which I haven't seen and if anyone wants to know I can make a list.

    The Mickey Mouse Club. The original 1955 - 1959 program was rerun for the 20th anniversary in 1975, but the hour-long episodes were cut to half an hour. The other half of each program is sealed in the Disney vaults along with Song of the South, (which incidentally I also haven't seen and would like to,) and of course I haven't seen any of it since 1975, though as I understand it has since been available somewhere...a friend has seen it who was not born until 1978.

    John and Julie, fun 1955 film about two British kids running off to see Queen Elizabeth's coronation. Features a rare early appearance by Peter Sellers.

    Sometime after the 1969 Disney movie of Sterling North's Rascal, a Japanese cartoon of over 50 episodes was produced, which, although it adds many characters and incidents not in the book, might still blow the Disney version out of the water. It is forbidden to air or transport any copy of it to the U. S. due to Disney owning U. S. rights. If they are going to be like that, Rascal is a movie which probably SHOULD be remade, instead of cranking out endless sequels to, and inferior versions of, films they got right the first time!

    The Curiosity Shop, an early 1970s children's program created by Chuck Jones. Supposedly lost when the video masters were taped over, but if I understand correctly what went out to TV stations were 16 mm prints some of which may still exist--I sure hope so.

    "Oregon Bound," a two-part episode of an obscure children's TV series, Go-USA. I'd be pleased to see ANY episode of Go-USA, but this one I want BADLY--I would welcome even a script or production stills. I have gone so far as to contact three of the actors, two directly and another through another actor. Two answered, one contacted me directly hoping I had a copy, the other said through his friend that he remembers being in it but nothing else. A copy of this actually does exist, but only in the Museum of Broadcasting in California. Again, I hope a 16 mm film of it turns up!

    A number of older TV-movies rarely see the light of day, which really should. A film of Truman Capote's A Christmas Memory is hailed as a classic. It might have run on PBS years ago but I've never seen it. The Addie Mills series by Gail Rock, The House Without a Christmas Tree, The Thanksgiving Treasure, Addie and the King of Hearts, and a fourth one, The Easter Promise or something. Great movies. One from the late 1970s of The Best Christmas Pageant Ever, said to be a perfect adaptation of the book. All of these books are readily available but I've either not seen the movies in 45 years, or never.

    Scary movies which have stuck with me since childhood, Something Evil, with Johnny Whitaker possessed, (before The Exorcist,) Crowhaven Farm, The Screaming Woman, The Failing of Raymond, and A Little Game. All (as I remember) awesome, but doomed, because they did not happen to be born theatrical, to moulder in obscurity. This must be remedied. Run them again and see how they hold up!
     
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  2. Amyghost

    Amyghost Member: Rank 3

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    The early Seventies multi-part BBC adaptation of Aldous Huxley's Eyeless in Gaza. Another one that ran on PBS many years ago, and I've never yet seen it since, it was an excellent and haunting adaptation of the novel and featured a fine cast. I've never understood why this hasn't been released to video, and haven't even been able to track down whether or not it still exists; The British Film Institute supposedly holds a copy but I've never been able to find any further information about it on their site.

    Also BBC, their late Sixties version of Emile Zola's Nana, starring Freddie Jones, atypically cast, and chillingly effective as the obsessed Count Muffat. Also aired on PBS decades ago, never to be seen since.

    The 1963 film version of Shakespeare's As You Like It, starring a young and radiant Vanessa Redgrave. This one did get some release in the UK last year as part of the celebrations of his 400th birthday, and I believe it was also shown in a few theaters in the US. However it should be given a general home-media release and I hope the recent screenings of it might cause this to happen.

    By the way, I like your list. There are a number of titles on it I recall with some affection (and good on you for recalling the Chuck Jones show!); I'd also add, as kids programming, the old Captain Kangaroo show, which predated Fred Rogers as a gentle bit of classic children's entertainment. I remember one episode where they adapted a sequence from Don Quixote--and did it quite well, too--for a young audience. Imagine any children's show doing that today?
     
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    #2 Amyghost, Mar 15, 2017
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  3. filmfan95

    filmfan95 Member: Rank 3

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    I want to see Song of the South, but the only way to see it is by downloading it illegally, and I'm not that desperate right now.
     
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  4. CoriSCapnSkip

    CoriSCapnSkip Member: Rank 1

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    About 45 years ago, the BBC also did a great adaptation of Tom Brown's School-Days I don't know has ever been seen since.
     
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  5. Nick91

    Nick91 Member: Rank 2

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    Interesting, had never heard of this one before. It appears (according to Wikipedia, at least) that the show's original title was just "Go" until the last season in 1975/76. So, I'm assuming that Oregon Bound was a Season 3 episode, correct? Other than that, Wikipedia gives very little information, so I had a look at IMDb next.

    Hmm, it has neither a cast (minus the narrator Greg Morris) nor an episodes list.

    Out of curiosity, how did you come across this television program to begin with? Also, is the Oregon Bound episode particularly interesting because the state has a special connection to you personally? Or is it mainly the plot that's intriguing to you? For what it's worth, here is the basic storyline, which was written about briefly in a few 1970s TV guides.

    The true story of a family's 600-mile journey to the West on the Oregon Bound is being broadcast in a two-part drama on the Bicentennial series ”Go-USA,” Saturday, May 1 12:30 p.m. on NBC-TV. Part II of ”Oregon Bound” will air next week. John Sager and his wife Elizabeth leave their home in Missouri and head west with their five children toward the ”promised land” of Oregon.

    *SPOILER ALERT* On the way, John and Elizabeth die of camp fever. The children, and a baby born to Elizabeth just before her death, continue the journey on their own, with 13 ½-year old John and 8-year old Catherine taking over as 'mother and father.' *SPOILER ALERT*
     
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    #5 Nick91, Mar 16, 2017
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  6. Amyghost

    Amyghost Member: Rank 3

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    I think I remember that one showing in the US. I didn't see it, but PBS ran ads for it I do believe. And no, I don't think it's ever resurfaced anywhere.
     
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  7. CoriSCapnSkip

    CoriSCapnSkip Member: Rank 1

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    Thanks for your interest. The TV program, and a much better-known theatrical movie, Seven Alone, which I have on DVD, were both based on a false version of a true story which occurred in my region and was a subject of fascination for me since being part of our third grade history unit. Despite every effort on my part, I was unable to view both parts of the TV show. The TV Guide listings were sometimes inaccurate and either another episode of Go-USA or another program entirely was shown when this was supposed to be on. I have visited the actual location (where they ended up) many times. (The book and movie even have the year wrong--it was 1844, not 1843.)

    [​IMG]

    If anyone wants to bother, I have a reasonably accurate cast list. Ready for a trip down memory lane?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Tony Markes played John, the oldest son. Moosie Drier played Frank, the second oldest son, and how in the world I happen to know is beyond me, because these TV Guide listings are all I have and his name does not appear there, yet somehow I knew this, and through a friend he has confirmed he remembers being in this but nothing else. Julie Markes, sister of Tony, played Catherine, the oldest daughter. Tony Markes and Moosie Drier both appeared on Little House on the Prairie around the same time, so it would be easy to at least find pictures of them from that. I did manage years ago to contact Julie Markes who was interested but unable to supply pictures.

    If, as your TV listing seems to indicate, in the TV version the parents were named John and Elizabeth, that explains why both Bill Jordan and Tony Markes are listed as John as well as Bill Jordan being listed as Pa, and Aubrey Martin (then spelled Aubri) is listed both as Ma and Elizabeth. I did find an IMDb listing for Aubrey Martin, but there were so many named Bill Jordan good luck finding the correct one. In real life, the parents were named Henry and Naomi. John was the oldest, and Elizabeth was the second daughter, fourth child. Apparently the TV program featured five children with a sixth born on the journey. In real life as in the theatrical version, it was six children with a seventh born on the way.

    After seeing the story mangled in a number of print and film tellings of various degrees of accuracy, I did write my own book, a fact-based fictional relating of the story. Unfortunately, dealing with an American settler family not named Ingalls, it is considered politically incorrect to publish in this country and I had to self-publish, but someday I might be able to arrange for its publication in another country which would be great!
     
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  8. Nick91

    Nick91 Member: Rank 2

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    Cori, local history has always interested me, so I can understand your eagerness to get a hold of the TV episode. Best of luck with getting your book published; you seem to imply that the real event had certain "controverisal" elements to it that makes it too risky for established publishing companies? I'm European myself so I'm probably unaware of what constitutes as PC/not PC when it comes to the American Frontier. The only thing I can think of would be some sort of negative depiction of Native Americans or something to that extent?

    In any case, thanks for those posted TV guides. Just to recap, we have the following cast for Oregon Bound:

    Bill Jordan: John Sager (father)
    Aubrey Martin: Elizabeth Sager
    Tony Markes: John Sager (son)
    Julie Markes: Catherine Sager
    Moosie Drier: Frank Sager

    Hypothetically speaking, if I were to find the names of the remaining cast members, would you be interested in contacting them (provided that they're still alive)? I can look into it if you want.
     
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  9. CoriSCapnSkip

    CoriSCapnSkip Member: Rank 1

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    As far as controversial, look up the Whitman Massacre of 1847, though the M-word is now frowned upon. Do you think you could seriously for sure gather more information on the episode? Perhaps someone in California would be willing to travel to the museum and view it?
     
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  10. Nick91

    Nick91 Member: Rank 2

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    While I won't be able to go all the way to California to view it, I think I can discover more cast members within hours. I have various ways of gathering obscure film/telelvision information, so I'll keep you updated whenever possible. :emoji_relaxed:
     
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  11. Nick91

    Nick91 Member: Rank 2

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    Alright, so here's what I was able to find:

    The episode was directed by Polish-American director Tad Danielewski. He passed away in 1993. The main writer was a guy named Paul Ritts. He appears to have died back in 1980.

    Now, there were five children in total in the show, plus the newborn baby. We know three of the child actors already. The remaining two children, Elizabeth and Matilda, were played by Laura Dixon and Terri Lynn Wood respectively. I don't know whether or not they are still active in show business. Since they were quite young at the time, they may have retired from acting since many years back and changed their last names upon marriage.

    Among the adult cast members, an actor named Charles Shull played a preacher named Whitman. And last but not least, the wagon train leader Williard was played by none other than Rance Howard, father of Ron & Clint. It seems that Rance, despite his advanced age, is still working steadily in the industry.
     
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  12. UncleSporkums

    UncleSporkums Member: Rank 1

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    I personally would like to get a look at
    The original, unfinished 1987 version of Apt Pupil starring Rick Schroeder and Nicol Williamson.

    A bunch of other Orson Welles' lost films/specials: The Deep, The Merchant of Venice, and his "Moby Dick" performance piece in full.
     
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  13. CoriSCapnSkip

    CoriSCapnSkip Member: Rank 1

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    Wow, amazing! Come to think of it, I did know the director's name, that his son wrote the experimental novel House of Leaves, and that the director himself had a fascinating survival story. Obviously I found this online so that must have been where I found Moosie's name, but that other information I have never seen--I would particularly remember Rance Howard! Awesome. Wonder if there is any way to contact Rance regarding this?
     
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  14. CoriSCapnSkip

    CoriSCapnSkip Member: Rank 1

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    I want the original film of Anne of Green Gables from 1919, believed to have been lost.

    I also want the missing footage from Buster Keaton's 1928 The Cameraman.
     
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  15. The Seeker

    The Seeker Member: Rank 5

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    Speaking of missing footage, I'd like to see the parts cut out of Freaks (1932), particularly with Hercules singing soprano, and without the sappy ending.
     
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  16. filmfan95

    filmfan95 Member: Rank 3

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    It would be cool to see the pre-release version of "The Land Before Time."
     
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  17. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    tumblr_ot87ocb4PW1wozku0o1_500.jpg


    Wish they would find this one....:emoji_disappointed:
     
  18. filmfan95

    filmfan95 Member: Rank 3

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    One lost film I can only dream of being found is The Fairylogue and Radioplays, the very first film based on the Oz books.
     
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  19. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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