Review Religion US vs. Europe.

Hux

Member: Rank 6
So, you state your opinion and end it like its obvious and then you over react to my opinion, sounds like you don't like to hear ideas differnt than yours and then you think I'm orwellian?
You're the one that made an assumption about my post. You're the one that felt compelled to comment on it.

The d'oh was an exclamation of irony (i.e. a policy of separating church and state actually helping to foster a more religious America).
 

Alex Vojacek

Administrator
Staff member
VIP
Of course I was the one making the assumption, why I replied. Did you think for a moment that I was some kind of perfect being?, well I am not LOL. I'm a human being just like you, I make assumptions sometimes based on my own experience, some are precise, some are chaotic. I bet similar things happens to you too.

But I didn't called you an orwellian because I made a mistake. That's my point. We can make mistakes, you clearly did too. We can only apologize and move on, no need to fight over it.
 

Carol

Member: Rank 5
Might come back and join this potentially discussion later, when things get a bit less snarly...
(Favourite line ever from an action movie - Point Break - "too much testosterone".

And breathe...and relax... and move on.
 

ant-mac

Administrator
Staff member
Might come back and join this potentially discussion later, when things get a bit less snarly...
(Favourite line ever from an action movie - Point Break - "too much testosterone".

And breathe...and relax... and move on.
The last comment before yours is nearly a fortnight old.

I think the testosterone has long since worn off.
 

Tuco

Member: Rank 2
Unpredictable stuff, though - there's a lot to be said for the phases of the moon.
LOL! I do tip my hat to the fairer gender, who also happen to be the tougher and more practical gender. Can't tell you how often in my younger days that my testosterone got me into trouble. Now that I'm an old man with testosterone levels barely above a whimper, life is so much more even-keeled.

Now onto religion in the U.S. . . . .

Yuck.
 

ant-mac

Administrator
Staff member
Vulcan, however, was married to Venus. Bet he brought placatory chocolate home once a month.... till she discovered a preference for Mars Bars.
I refer to the fictional alien planet, not the fictional ancient god.

A waste of time, effort and chocolate.
 

Carol

Member: Rank 5
with testosterone levels barely above a whimper
Hah! I find that whimpering is never to be underestimated, my new friend, and thanks for the validation.
And you're right - I think "yuck" covers a lot of ground when theology and real life try to destruct each other through the medium of people just trying to live their lives. "Blah" works too.

PS - Who/ what/ why "Tuco"? - great name, but new to me.
 

Carol

Member: Rank 5
I refer to the fictional alien planet, not the fictional ancient god.

A waste of time, effort and chocolate.
It's highly logical to equate the fictional god of volcanoes with the fictional planet of Spock - because Roddenberry nicked the damn word in the first place.

Also - my time and effort are my choice, and chocolate is never wasted - just ask all women, everywhere.
 

ant-mac

Administrator
Staff member
It's highly logical to equate the fictional god of volcanoes with the fictional planet of Spock
If it is equated in a correct or relevant context, then I agree. How does a failed romantic relationship between two fictional ancient gods equate with the fictional alien home-world of the first Vulcan to join Starfleet?
because Roddenberry nicked the damn word in the first place
That would seem to be a fairly well-known fact.
Also - my time and effort are my choice, and chocolate is never wasted
I was not referring to your time or effort, but to the time and effort of the fictional ancient god Vulcan.
just ask all women, everywhere.
From personal experience, I know that this statement is incorrect.
 

Carol

Member: Rank 5
and chocolate is never wasted - just ask all women, everywhere.
From personal experience, I know that this statement is incorrect.
To paraphrase Penny from Big Bang "I speak for all women - we had a meeting - the chocolate thing: it's a Woman Thing"

And to answer your astrological question - even Chaucer makes comedy out of the parallels between the observation of Venus as a planetary body and her slutty reputation in classical myth - might not be the funniest of puns, but at least it's over 600 years old = cut it some slack, maybe?
 

ant-mac

Administrator
Staff member
To paraphrase Penny from Big Bang "I speak for all women - we had a meeting - the chocolate thing: it's a Woman Thing"
I've never watched that TV series.

In any case, it is not "a Woman Thing". Both males and females like and dislike chocolate.
And to answer your astrological question
Traditionally, astrology is considered to be the study of the movements and relative positions of celestial objects as a means for divining information about human affairs and terrestrial events. Astrology has its roots in early calendrical systems, which were used to predict seasonal shifts and to interpret celestial cycles as signs of divine communications. As such, I have made no astrological enquiries.
even Chaucer makes comedy out of the parallels between the observation of Venus as a planetary body and her slutty reputation in classical myth
What a charming and witty fellow.

What was his policy regarding males who were unfaithful to their partners?
might not be the funniest of puns, but at least it's over 600 years old = cut it some slack, maybe?
Why?

Once again, how does a failed romantic relationship between two fictional ancient gods equate with the fictional alien home-world of the first Vulcan to join Starfleet?
 

Carol

Member: Rank 5
Let me walk you through references you are clearly not getting:

In any case, it is not "a Woman Thing". Both males and females like and dislike chocolate.
Pre-menstrual urges for chocolate are well documented. This tends to affect women.

Traditionally, astrology is considered to be the study of the movements and relative positions of celestial objects as a means for divining information about human affairs and terrestrial events.
And lends itself very readily to anthropomorphic personifications. Hence planet names/ characters in myths (both ancient classical legends and, I suggest, contemporary science-fiction).

What was his policy regarding males who were unfaithful to their partners
He was a comic writer and, as such, didn't really have "policies". His Wife of Bath appears to be a joyous serial monogamist so I don't think any of her men would've dared be unfaithful to her; his Crisseid cheats on Troilus and we last see him, in heaven, laughing off all the silliness of the human condition.

And lastly, anyone appropriating a name, here "Vulcan", which carries thousands of years of cultural baggage, can expect some enquiring minds to ponder the choice and have a bit of fun running with the consequences.

Hope that helps.
 

ant-mac

Administrator
Staff member
Let me walk you through references you are clearly not getting:
If you feel the need to clarify yourself and improve on your communication skills, feel free to do so.
Pre-menstrual urges for chocolate are well documented. This tends to affect women.
But it does not affect to every female in every case. There are those who simply do not suffer from any urges during that time period and there are those who may suffer mild or strong urges for something else entirely. Meanwhile, there are other people - of either gender - who may suffer from a strong urge for chocolate at a point in time that has no connection to the menstruation process.

You may wish to re-check your documentation on this issue.
And lends itself very readily to anthropomorphic personifications. Hence planet names/ characters in myths (both ancient classical legends and, I suggest, contemporary science-fiction).
Probably.
He was a comic writer and, as such, didn't really have "policies". His Wife of Bath appears to be a joyous serial monogamist so I don't think any of her men would've dared be unfaithful to her; his Crisseid cheats on Troilus and we last see him, in heaven, laughing off all the silliness of the human condition.
Writers - comic or otherwise - often have intensely strong beliefs, ideas, opinions, policies and so forth.

That's why they write.
And lastly, anyone appropriating a name, here "Vulcan", which carries thousands of years of cultural baggage, can expect some enquiring minds to ponder the choice and have a bit of fun running with the consequences.
Who was appropriating a name here?
Hope that helps.
Good luck with that hope.
 

Carol

Member: Rank 5
Who was appropriating a name here?
Roddenberry, remember him?
I'll leave it at that my friend - your deterrent pedantry depresses me as much as your lack of anything approaching a sense of humour, proportion, manners or knowing when to quit.
 

Carol

Member: Rank 5
And you thought it was testosterone.
And that feels like a very, very long time ago - at least I feel very, very much older and wiser, but not necessarily anywhere near drunk enough.

Hi Hux - thanks for the comment here - I just left you a very brief message elsewhere about pasta - couldn't immediately grab my Italian dictionary, but i think I'm right.
 

ant-mac

Administrator
Staff member
Roddenberry, remember him?
Yes, you simply didn't make it clear in your previous post who you were speaking about.

Thank you for the clarification.
I'll leave it at that my friend
As you wish.
your deterrent pedantry depresses me
Meanwhile, I didn't find your esoteric pedantry to be depressing - merely irrelevant.
as much as your lack of anything approaching a sense of humour
Oh, don't worry. I have a sense of humour.

And if you ever say anything funny, I'll let you know.
proportion
In what way?
manners or knowing when to quit.
Your manners are your business. I feel it would be unwise to comment on them.

As for quitting, I know perfectly well when I should quit.

When I'm good and ready - and not before.

Cheers.
 
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