Review The History of "LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT"

Discussion in 'Fame & Infamy' started by Doctor Omega, Apr 8, 2018.

  1. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    15,565
    Likes Received:
    3,069
    scena1.jpg


    They were unlikely to ever blow the world away with a stunning dramatic performance in a hollywood film...

    But chances are John Nathan Turner would still be casting them in Doctor Who today were he around!

    Chat here about those tv presenters, novelty acts, stand up comedians and singers - often turned quiz show hosts - who you either liked or loathed!



     
    #1 Doctor Omega, Apr 8, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2018
  2. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    15,565
    Likes Received:
    3,069
  3. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    15,565
    Likes Received:
    3,069
  4. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    15,565
    Likes Received:
    3,069





    I found a video by this guy...

    He is not happy....


    My Regrettable Appearance On Blind Date 1994 - Cilla Black







    Undercover Journalist on Blind Date


    And then an undercover reporter tried to sneak on the show, under Cilla's nose....

    It backfired....








    Eventually Cilla quit the show on air, without telling the bosses first.....


    Cilla Black quits Blind Date live on air



     
    #4 Doctor Omega, Apr 8, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2018
  5. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    15,565
    Likes Received:
    3,069
    Ali_Bongo.jpg


    William Oliver Wallace (8 December 1929 – 8 March 2009), known by his stage name Ali Bongo, was a British comedy magician and president of The Magic Circle who performed an act in which he was known as the "Shriek of Araby"


    Early life

    Born as William Oliver Wallace in England,[3] where his father (also called William[4]) was serving as a sergeant major with the 1st Battalion of the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment. Young William spent his early years on a British station in Trimulgherry, Secunderabad before going to Britain with his mother Lillian, at the age of seven.

    After William Wallace senior had ended his army service, the family moved to Sutton Valence in Kent and young William won a scholarship to Sutton Valence School, leaving at 16 to begin his career as an entertainer. His time in National Service was spent with the Royal Army Pay Corps. He worked for Harry Stanley's Unique Magic Studio and was manager of the magic department at Hamleystoy shop in London's Regent Street.

    Career

    Wallace created his Shriek of Araby character with an oriental costume (robes, golden curly-toed slippers, horn-rimmed spectacles and headgear that incorporated both fez and turban) and took the name Ali Bongo from a character he had created for a youth club pantomime he had co-written and appeared in while in his teens. The original character had sung a song which began: "My name is Ali Bongo and I come from Pongo, pong-tiddley-pongo land."[5] Among his later magic catch-phrases were "Uju Buju Suck Another Juju", "Aldy Bority Phostico Formio", "Hocus Pocus Fishbones Chokus".[4]

    He made his British TV debut on The Good Old Days in 1965 on a bill topped by Tommy Trinder.[4]

    Ali Bongo wrote many books on magic, many containing tricks of his own. He also illustrated them in his instantly recognisable style. He acted as magic consultant for many plays, opera, ballets and TV shows including David Nixon's Magic Box and The David Nixon Magic Show for Thames Television and The Paul Daniels Magic Show for the BBC.[6]

    Ali Bongo was the presenter of the Ali Bongo’s Cartoon Carnival, which featured himself and his assistant Oscar. It aired on UK TV BBC1 on Saturdays between 23 October and 18 December 1971, a total of nine episodes.[5]

    Bongo was featured in an episode of Children's TV show Rainbow, appeared in the science-fiction show The Tomorrow People in the serial "Revenge of Jedikiah" and had a slot in Zokko!.[7] He also acted as the magical advisor on the TV show Doctor Who and the 70s cult series, Ace of Wands. His legendary ability for devising tricks and illusions and solving magical problems inspired the TV writer, David Renwick, to create a character who was a magician's assistant and amateur sleuth in the series Jonathan Creek. Bongo was magical adviser to the series.[1][5]

    Bongo joined The Magic Circle in 1960 and, two years later was made a Member of The Inner Magic Circle. He won The Magic Circle Magician of the Year in 1972, the Carlton Comedy Award in 1983 and the David Berglas Award in 1991. He served twice as vice-president of The Magic Circle before being elected president on 8 September 2008.[4]

    Death[edit]
    At the beginning of February 2009, Bongo collapsed while giving a lecture in Paris. He was taken to hospital and, whilst there, suffered a stroke. Bongo was subsequently returned to the United Kingdom and cared for in St Thomas's Hospital, London, where he later died from complications arising from pneumonia on 8 March.[1][8][9]

    Ali Bongo's cremation and broken wand ceremony took place on 27 March 2009 at Randalls Park Crematorium, Leatherhead



     
  6. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    15,565
    Likes Received:
    3,069
    p02c735n.jpg


    Rod Hull

    Rod Hull
    Born
    Rodney Stephen Hull
    13 August 1935
    Isle of Sheppey, Kent, England
    Died 17 March 1999 (aged 63)
    Winchelsea, East Sussex, England
    Cause of death Severe skull fracture and chest injuries, caused by falling off a roof while fixing a TV aerial
    Occupation Entertainer, comedian
    Notable work Emu
    Children Toby
    Deborah
    Danielle
    Rodney Stephen "Rod" Hull (13 August 1935 – 17 March 1999) was an English comedian, best known as a popular entertainer on British television in the 1970s and 1980s. He rarely appeared without Emu, a mute, highly aggressive arm-length puppet modelled on the Australian flightless emu bird.



    Career

    Hull was born in the Isle of Sheppey, Kent, England in 1935.[1] He attended Delemark Road School and the County Technical School, Sheerness. After national service with the RAF, he qualified as an electrician. He married his first wife Sandra in 1958; they had two daughters, Deborah and Danielle.[2]

    His first job in television was as a lighting technician with TCN Channel 9 in Sydney, after moving to Australia in 1961.[1] He then began appearing on air, notably as Constable Clot in Channel 9's Kaper Kops with Reg Gorman and Desmond Tester, a regular segment in its children's afternoon programming. Clot proved very popular and soon gained his own segment, Clot in the Clouds, which depicted Constable Clot daydreaming about having other professions, such as a world-famous brain surgeon, 'Blood Clot'.

    Later he worked with Marilyn Mayo as co-host of a children's breakfast TV programme, The Super Flying Fun Show, playing a wacky character named 'Caretaker Clot', an extension of his Kaper Cops role. Hull first used Emu as a puppet in this show. There are conflicting reports as to how this came about: Hull stated, "Sure I found him in a cupboard but I had put him there in the first place. I concocted him, nobody else." However, a Channel Nine producer, Jim Badger, recalled that he had requested a reluctant Hull to use Emu.[1] The bird subsequently became a regular part of Hull's set on cabarets back in the United Kingdom and Australia.

    Hull returned to Britain in 1971 and signed with International Artists (after Emu tore up the office).[1] Soon after, his Australian success translated to his native country with Hull appearing on several children's and adult light entertainment shows.

    His first UK television appearance came on the ITV show Saturday Variety, but it was his appearance in the 1972 Royal Variety Performance that provided his springboard to national recognition.[1]

    Hull was a fan of the football club Bristol Rovers, and he recorded a song called "Bristol Rovers All the Way" in 1974, with the squad of that time.

    Emu

    Hull's puppet represented a side of his personality that enabled the entertainer to create a kind of gleeful havoc, while not seemingly being to blame for it. This was aided by the simple yet effective conceit of a false arm attached to Hull's jacket, which cradled the emu, thereby making it appear that the neck and head moved of its own volition. This apparently independent movement gave the illusion that the bird had its own personality, which entailed sudden, unprovoked attacks on anyone and anything that came too close. During these events Hull would make half-hearted attempts to pull the badly-behaved bird away from its victim but would often become embroiled in the fracas, rolling around on the floor to create a scene of mayhem.

    When Hull left The Super Flying Fun Show and Australia, a duplicate of Emu was made so the character could continue on the show, much to Hull's annoyance, and comedian Marty Morton took over Hull's co-hosting position in Australia.

    Hull and Emu were regulars on the Hudson Brothers Razzle Dazzle Show, which aired for one season as a Saturday morning kids' show on American broadcaster CBS in 1974.

    There were apparently no boundaries for Emu's outrageous behaviour. In 1972, it destroyed The Queen Mother's bouquet of flowers during the after-show line-up at the aforementioned Royal Variety Performance, after which he appeared in many other shows. During 1976 Hull and the uncontrollable Emu made their most famous appearances when Emu repeatedly attacked Michael Parkinson during his eponymous chat show, eventually causing the interviewer to fall off his chair.[5] Fellow guest Billy Connolly threatened, "If that bird comes anywhere near me, I'll break its neck and your bloody arm!". Perhaps mindful of his professional future, Hull swiftly got his "pet" back on best behaviour. In later years, Parkinson lamented the fact that despite all the star guests he had interviewed during his career, he would always be remembered for "that bloody bird".

    This led to his own television series Emu's Broadcasting Company (1975–1980), Emu's World, EMU TV and Emu's All Live Pink Windmill Show.

    He was the subject of This Is Your Life in 1982 when he was surprised by Eamonn Andrews.[6]

    In 1983 he travelled to America where he appeared on The Tonight Show, attacking Johnny Carson, even after he was told not to by the producers, and Richard Pryor in one of the comedian's first public appearances after undergoing major emergency reconstructive surgery on his face.



     
  7. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    15,565
    Likes Received:
    3,069
    Later life

    In the late 1980s Hull bought Restoration House in Rochester for £270,000 but the cost of renovations and an unpaid tax bill resulted in bankruptcy in 1994.[8] Hull's second wife, Cher Hylton-Hull, already had a daughter, Catrina, and the couple had three children together: Toby, Amelia and Oliver.[2] Cher, who had been instrumental in his success, moved the family to her home country of Australia, while Hull remained in England and moved to a shepherd's cottage in East Sussex.

    Hull was in the public eye less frequently during the 1990s, appearing in pantomime and television commercials, and winning the 1993 "Pipe Smoker of the Year" award. Nonetheless, his name remained well known, and comedians Richard Herring and Stewart Lee included a "false Rod Hull" character in their 1996 television sketch show, Fist of Fun, played by Kevin Eldon. This character was performed as a grotesque imitation, a character who was finally unmasked by the real Rod Hull, who appeared (minus Emu) in the last episode of the series.[9] It was to be Hull's penultimate television appearance.

    A 2003 Channel 4 documentary, Rod Hull: A Bird in the Hand,[10] revealed that Hull nursed an increasing resentment towards his puppet, believing that the success of the bird prevented him from pursuing other avenues in show business. He saw himself, according to the makers of the programme, as a talented performer who could have developed a more varied career in the entertainment industry had he not been repeatedly forced to play the 'and Emu' role. Hull once complained, "I want to write but Emu doesn't leave me the time. I want to be a comedian in my own right, but again Emu won't let me do it."[1]

    Death

    On 17 March 1999, Hull climbed onto the roof of his bungalow – named Shepherd's Cottage, in Winchelsea, near Rye, East Sussex – to adjust his television aerial during the second leg of a Champions League quarter-final football tie between Internazionale and Manchester United at the San Siro. It was a procedure he had carried out frequently, as shown in home video footage included in the 2003 documentary Rod Hull: A Bird in the Hand.[11] In his attempt to improve reception, he slipped from the roof and fell through an adjoining greenhouse. The 63-year-old entertainer suffered a severe skull fracture and chest injuries. He was pronounced dead on arrival at Conquest Hospital in Hastings.

    Following an inquest, the East Sussex Coroner, Alan Craze, recorded a verdict of accidental death.[12]

    Legacy

    Prior to Hull's death, Lee and Herring had planned to revive their "false Rod Hull" character for their contemporary series, This Morning with Richard Not Judy, but although they filmed several sketches – in which the character would die after performing a pointless stunt – the footage was never used.[13] Instead, the final episode of the second and final series of This Morning with Richard Not Judy concluded with a post-credits sketch featuring Kevin Eldon's Rod Hull character, fading out to a simple dedication reading "This series is dedicated to Rod Hull".

    Hull was the subject of a song by the Merseyside group Half Man Half Biscuit. Hull and Emu were also the subject of the song "No One Knew The Real Emu" by The Toy Dolls.

    Upon Hull's death, Michael Parkinson reminisced that he had found him to be "a very charming, intelligent and sensitive man–quite unlike the Emu." He observed that the puppet "was the dark side of Rod's personality, and very funny, provided it was not on top of you."[14]

    His son Toby brought Emu out of retirement for the first time since his father's death during the 2003 pantomime season, appearing in Cinderella at the Theatre Royal, Windsor. Toby Hull and Emu appeared in their own series on CITV.[15]

    In 2016, the World War 2-themed video game Hearts of Iron 4 was released, featuring Hull as the leader of a non-aligned Australia.



     
  8. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    15,565
    Likes Received:
    3,069
    Dale Winton

    Dale_Winton_on_Supermarket_Sweep.jpg


    Winton presenting Dale's Supermarket Sweep
    Born Dale Jonathan Winton
    22 May 1955[1]
    Marylebone, London, England
    Died 18 April 2018 (aged 62)
    Nationality British
    Occupation Radio DJ/Broadcaster
    Years active 1987–2018
    Television Dale's Supermarket Sweep(1993–2000, 2007)
    In It to Win It (2002–2016)
    Hole in the Wall (2008)
    Parent(s)
    Dale Jonathan Winton (22 May 1955 – 18 April 2018)[2] was an English radio DJ and television presenter, best known for presenting the shows including Dale's Supermarket Sweep from 1993 until 2000 and again in 2007, the National Lottery game show In It to Win Itbetween 2002 and 2016 and the 2008 series of Hole in the Wall.


    Early life
    Winton was born on 22 May 1955. His father, Gary, was Jewish and his mother, actress Sheree Winton, converted to Judaism. Winton's father died on the day of his bar mitzvah[3] and Winton was brought up by his mother.


    Career
    Television
    Winton began his television career in 1986 on Pet Watch,[7] before working for Channel 4, Lifestyle Channel and ITV.[2] From 1993 to 2000, Winton hosted Dale's Supermarket Sweep during the daytime TV period on ITV. In 2007, Supermarket Sweep was revived after a 5 1⁄2-year absence. Winton portrayed himself as an irritating gameshow presenter in Danny Boyle's 1996 film Trainspotting.[8] In 1995 and 1996 Winton presented BBC's Saturday night gameshow Pets Win Prizes.

    In 1997 he presented the final of the Great British Song Contest, the UK's national pre-selection for the Eurovision Song Contest, due to a tie-in with the lottery programme.[9]Between that year and 2002, he also presented a dating show called The Other Half. In 1999, he appeared on the sitcom Gimme Gimme Gimme with Kathy Burke in the episode Do They Take Sugar?.

    He was the subject of This Is Your Life in 2000 when he was surprised by Michael Aspel.

    In 2001, he presented Channel 5's endurance show Touch the Truck.[12] In 2002, Winton began presenting the National Lottery game show In It to Win It. In 2016, the show ended after its eighteenth series.

    In 2003, he appeared in the BBC Three mockumentary, Dale's Wedding, in which he supposedly married the UK celebrity Nell McAndrew.

    From 2003 until 2004, he hosted two series of Stars Reunited where the casts of popular British television series were reunited after many years.

    Between 2004 and 2006, he presented three series of the celebrity weight loss "boot camp" programme, Celebrity Fit Club on ITV.[15] In April 2006, he guest presented an episode of BBC Two's pop quiz Never Mind the Buzzcocks.

    In August 2006, he was chosen to host the pilot of Endemol's new show, Show Me What You've Got; however, the show did not receive a full series.

    In February 2008, he completed a pilot show for BBC One called You've Got The Answer, a game show that surprised the public using hidden cameras. Winton presented BBC One's Saturday night entertainment programme Hole In The Wall in 2008, based on the Japanese original, where contestants in skin-tight lycra costumes contorted themselves to fit through oddly-shaped holes in a moving wall.[18] The show returned for a second series in 2009, but Anton du Beke replaced Winton as host.

    Winton began appearing in television advertisements for cashmygold.co.uk. Winton appeared on Matt Lucas and David Walliams' BBC comedy series Come Fly With Me. He appeared in the last episode of the series, playing himself.

    In 2012, he hosted one-off ITV game show Dale's Great Getaway. The show has not returned to the schedules since.

    Since February 2018, Winton hosted the travelogue series Dale Winton's Florida Fly Drive for Channel 5.

    Radio
    In 2000, Winton took over from Alan Freeman to present Pick of the Pops on BBC Radio 2,[20] and hosted the show until 30 October 2010, when Tony Blackburn replaced him.

    Personal life
    In 2002 he released his autobiography in which he wrote about his rise to fame, his actress mother's suicide and came out about his homosexuality.

    On 18 April 2018, his long-term agent Jan Kennedy reported that Winton had died at his home earlier that day. The cause of his death was not disclosed.






     

Share This Page