Review The Strangest Films You Have Ever Seen!

Janine The Barefoot

Wacky Norwegian Woman
Pan's Labyrinth: Brilliant but strange
Nosferatu: Creepiest vampire ever
Ditto Seeker! I love, love, love Guillermo Del Toro and think his visual take on the world is brilliant. We should compare notes on his movies sometime.

Also Nosferatu is, in my mind, one of the most beautiful and underrated vampire films of all time. It's kind of a visual "Metropolis"!

I think I'd like to crawl around in the "movie" section of your brain for awhile Seeker! :emoji_hugging:

:emoji_kiss: :emoji_dancer:
 

Elliot Thomas

Member: Rank 3
I'd plump for INLAND EMPIRE. It was like David Lynch was trying to confuse/provoke his fans even more than normal. I wonder if Laura Dern even understood what the hell was going on. Still great stuff and worthy of multiple viewings. The most perplexing film that's improves every time I watch it is DONNIE DARKO. My first reaction was "What the hell was that?!" but by #10 watch I was completely transfixed by the whole experience. Richard Kelly really caught lightning in a bottle with that one. One of a kind.
 

duzit

Member: Rank 6

Snowpiercer - 2013
Just caught this overnight on a Syfy viewing. I'm not really sure how to describe this film. It definately was different to the point that it kept my interest. It was so visually entertaining that I didn't want to miss a minute of action. I found it to be strange, but not boring.

It didn't garner a lot of attention in the U.S. box office, but Snowpiercer's rave reviewsplaces it in elite company among sci-fi films of the past decade. Set in a dystopianfuture, the remainder of Earth's inhabitants are living on a train that continuously travels across the globe, with the rest of the world uninhabitable due to devastating climate change. What helps Snowpiercer — and its lead, Captain America's Chris Evans — stand apart is its exploration of the class system on the train cars, with the wealthy taking the bulk of the front of the train and leaving very few resources for the lower classes, who eventually fight back.
 

Janine The Barefoot

Wacky Norwegian Woman
The first one isn't as out there as some might think
I want you to know that I both like you and have a high amount of respect for you TSIS........ But........ uhmmmmmmm
I couldn't watch the trailers! Now, I'm the first person to admit that I'm a wuss but the trailers S.... I couldn't watch the
trailers without hiding behind my fingers! It could be as "close" (as opposed to "not that far") as my own back yard and
I'm pretty sure I couldn't make the emotional, or visual (as in being able to watch) leap required for me to watch that film.
I saw the faces of those poor people on the gurneys TSIM.......... and, as I said, I'm a very real wuss!

For some reason (before I knew about VS) I could get through a movie like JC with that "crazy like being on a rollercoaster"
kind of feeling and even though I had to hide behind various fingers and pillows, I could still watch it and get that thrill ride
sensation. But the look on those people's faces as they lay on those gurneys, knowing what was going to happen to them was
just more than I could manage in any way, shape or form. I know it sounds strange but I can handle the "monsters". It's the
things people do to each other (even in films) that are completely out of my reach. Maybe it's because I know that man, in real life,
is capable of actually visiting unimaginable horrors on each other in real life that makes it so much further than I can go........
Honestly, I don't know. What I can tell you is that I still regard Hostel as "horror porn", think that should have been rated X and that just
knowing what (given some of Doc O's latest releases on Prometheus Covenant) the fate of Elizabeth Shaw became along with the how/why of her fate in that in the movie well then, I wouldn't be able to watch that either.

Aliens, Predators, The Creeper.... all no problem. But put one guy on the planet who was willing to paralyze a woman and sacrifice her to a predator to prove his loyalty to them well, that's where I have to call it quits. Even the Predator didn't want him. They, at least, don't seem to regard turning on each other as a desirable behavioral asset.

But then, I just watched Denial over the week-end, with my Mom whose Dad (my Grandfather) had relatives in Norway working with the underground to move bricks of gold stolen back from the Nazi's to be taken across Scandinavia on the backs of guys dressed in white for camouflage. They did it on cross-country skis just to aide some of the people who had escaped Germany and had nothing left but the clothes on their backs. But also to keep the gold out of the hands of the SS in general.... Well, having seen that movie and knowing that there are deniers like that out there just makes me physically ill. And no, for some reason I cannot separate "movie behavior" from actual "human behavior". I guess because to me it's all in there. We've got hundreds of years of evidence...
thousands even.... of how humans are capable of treating each other and I'm never going to be able to see it as entertainment......
What can I say?....... Wuss! One with what may be considered by others to be a confusing sense of morality.

I just know how I feel and what works for me along with what doesn't and "Human Centipede" is never going to be a movie that
will stand as art.... or even something I can watch for that matter.... in the eyes of this "beholder".

I admire your courage though. My inability to separate any number of things where human behavior is concerned has screwed
with all kinds of other things in my life and a lot of them haven't ended up pretty.... Or even with relationships that could survive my
beliefs...... (too personal and TMI to go into at this point)

:emoji_kiss::emoji_dancer:
 

SoapboxQuantez08

Member: Rank 2
Cathy's Curse (1977): Quite good, imo. The lighting is strange, with a foggish glow the entire film.
The little girl is a hoot with her foul language.
Murder Mansion (1972): There's not much coherency here, but it's part of the appeal. I've only seen it once, but I remember the ending being bloody and spectacular.
 

Doctor Omega

Administrator
Staff member
VIP
One of the scariest short films ever made. La cabina (The Telephone Box) is a 1972 film directed by Spanish director Antonio Mercero, and written by him and José Luis Garci.

 
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