Review They Shall Not Grow Old (2018)

Doctor Omega

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Your thoughts on this documentary movie.....

A documentary about World War I with never-before-seen footage to commemorate the centennial of the end of the war.



 

Doctor Omega

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Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old”


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The trailer has been released for “They Shall Not Grow Old,” Peter Jackson’s World War I documentary which features some superbly restored century-old film footage shot during The Great War.

Jackson and his team took black and white footage from the BBC and Imperial War Museums’ archives, cleaned up the prints and digitally colorised it – the result showing details that have never been seen before.

The clip shows comparisons of the original and restored footage as well. Jackson uses the voices of the men involved in the film which shows the grim realities of war on the front line as well as the soldier’s attitudes towards the conflict.

“They Shall Not Grow Old” is set to premiere on October 16th in the U.K. with a special Q&A with Jackson and then opens to European theaters.
 

Doctor Omega

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Jackson’s WW1 Doco Eyes Cinema Run



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Peter Jackson’s World War I archive film “They Shall Not Grow Old” pulled in an estimated $731,000 across 247 screens for its one night only screening in the UK last night – putting it second at the local box-office.

Reaction has been so positive that the team behind it is now in talks for potential international and U.S. release plans along with additional encore screenings in the UK.

The doco remasters original archival footage from the first World War, colorises it and adds some modern production techniques to bring it all together. The result is footage that almost looks like it could’ve been shot yesterday.

Reviews have been excellent and The BBC will broadcast the 100 minute film in the UK on Armistice Day, November 11th.
 

Doctor Omega

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Warners Takes Jackson’s WWI Doco Rights


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Warner Bros. Pictures has acquired the global distribution rights to the Peter Jackson-directed WWI documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old” which premiered at the London Film Festival earlier this month.

The film blends previously unseen film footage and audio recordings from the Imperial War Museum’s film archives with state of the art technology that includes colorized and sharpened images converted to stereoscopic 3D. The doco humanizes the experiences of the young British soldiers who fought in the war a century ago.

The film was screened for top Warners studio brass who then made the decision to pick up the film and are now planning to release it theatrically around the world likely before year’s end. Sadly the picture won’t be eligible for Best Documentary consideration by the Academy as it missed this year’s October 1st deadline.
 

Doctor Omega

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Each frame of the film was hand-coloured and the footage 3D-digitised to allow the viewer to see and hear the troops as we imagine they really were.

Jackson used forensic lip-readers to find out what the soldiers were saying and then had actors voice their words.
 

Doctor Omega

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They Shall Not Grow Old 'brought the war to life for us'


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-46194106


Teacher Tom Rogers had a surprise for his Year 12 students when they sat down in class this week - instead of normal lessons, he showed them Peter Jackson's ground-breaking programme on World War One, They Shall Not Grow Old.

It uses technology to transform black and white archive footage of soldiers into a visceral, full-colour documentary - and is probably the nearest thing we'll get to travelling back in time.

The reaction from the students was immediate, Mr Rogers says.

"They were in awe when the colour kicked in and the screen expanded. You should have seen the look on their faces. I had to say to them, 'This is not acting, that's real people.'

"They had studied World War One in Year 9 so they had the context to the conflict but this was real life, the war brought to life through the voices, the faces, the camaraderie, even details like the latrines."
 
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