Review Troubled Stars

Discussion in 'Film: General' started by Doctor Omega, Sep 9, 2018.

  1. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    They've got it all.... then self-destruct.....

    What goes wrong?




     
  2. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    Rare Bela Lugosi Post Sanitarium Interview!




     
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  3. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    In the early hours of December 31, 1971, Duel died at his Hollywood Hills home of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. Duel's girlfriend, Dianne Ray, was at his home at the time of his death and discovered his body. Ray later told police the two had watched Duel's series Alias Smith and Jones the previous evening. She later went to sleep in another room while Duel stayed up. Sometime after midnight, Duel entered the bedroom, retrieved his revolver and told Ray "I'll see you later." Ray then said she heard a gunshot from another room and discovered Duel's body.

    According to police, Duel's friends and family said he was depressed about his drinking problem. He had been arrested and pleaded guilty to a DUI accident that injured two people the previous June.[9] Duel's death was later ruled a suicide.[10]

    Duel's funeral was held at the Self-Realization Fellowship Temple on January 2, 1972, in Pacific Palisades. At the service, Duel's girlfriend read a poem he wrote, titled "Love". An estimated 1,000 friends and fans attended.[11][12] His body was flown to Penfield, New York, where he was buried in Oakwood Cemetery.[13]

    After his death, his role in Alias Smith and Jones was taken over by Roger Davis who was previously the narrator over the opening theme of the show. The loss of Duel proved too great for the series to be sustained and the series was cancelled in 1973.



     
  4. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    Millicent Lilian "Peg" Entwistle (February 5, 1908 – September 16, 1932) was a Welsh-born English stage and screen actress. Entwistle began her stage career in 1925, appearing in several Broadway productions. She appeared in only one film, Thirteen Women, which was released after her death.

    Entwistle gained notoriety after she jumped to her death from the "H" on the Hollywoodland sign in September 1932, at the age of 24.

    By May 1932, at the height of the Great Depression, Entwistle was in Los Angeles with a role in the Romney Brent play The Mad Hopes starring Billie Burke,[19] which ran from 23 May to 4 June at the Belasco Theatre in downtown Los Angeles. Theatre critic Flo Lawrence commented:

    "...Belasco and Curran have staged the new play most effectively and have endowed this Romney Brent opus with every distinction of cast and direction. (producer) Bela Blau ... has developed the comedy to its highest points. Costumes and settings are of delightful quality, and every detail makes the production one entirely fit for its translation to the New York stage. In the cast Peg Entwistle and Humphrey Bogart hold first place in supporting the star (Billie Burke) and both give fine, serious performances. Miss Entwistle as the earnest, young daughter (Geneva Hope) of a vague mother and presents a charming picture of youth..."

    After The Mad Hopes closed, Entwistle found her first and only credited film role for Radio Pictures (later RKO). Thirteen Women stars Myrna Loy and Irene Dunne in a pre-Hays code, high-budget thriller produced by David O. Selznick and drawn from the novel by Tiffany Thayer. Entwistle played a small supporting role as Hazel Cousins.

    It premiered on 14 October 1932, a month after her death, at the Roxy Theatre in New York City and was released in Los Angeles on 11 November to neither critical nor commercial success. By the time it was re-released in 1935, 14 minutes had been cut from the film's original 73 minute running length. In 2008 Variety magazine cited Thirteen Women as one of the earliest "female ensemble" films.

    On 16 September 1932, an anonymous woman telephoned the Los Angeles police and said that while hiking she had found a woman's shoe, purse and jacket below the Hollywoodland sign. The woman said she looked in the purse and found a suicide note. She then said she looked down the mountain and saw a body. According to a police transcript of the call, the woman said she "wrapped a jacket, shoes and purse in a bundle and laid them on the steps of the Hollywood Police Station." The anonymous woman refused to identify herself.

    A detective and two radio car officers found the body of a moderately well-dressed, blonde-haired, blue-eyed woman in a ravine below the sign. Entwistle remained unidentified until her uncle (at whose Beachwood Canyon home she had been living) connected her two-day absence with the description and initials "P.E." on a suicide note which had been found in the purse and published by the newspapers.

    He said that on Friday, 16 September she had told him she was going for a walk to a drugstore and see some friends. The police surmised that instead she made her way to the nearby southern slope of Mount Lee to the foot of the Hollywoodland sign, climbed a workman's ladder to the top of the "H" and jumped.

    The cause of death was listed by the coroner as "multiple fractures of the pelvis."

    The suicide note as published read:

    "I am afraid, I am a coward. I am sorry for everything. If I had done this a long time ago, it would have saved a lot of pain. P.E."

    Entwistle's death brought wide and often sensationalised publicity. Her funeral was held at the WM Strathers Mortuary in Hollywood on 20 September.

    Her body was cremated and the ashes were later sent to Glendale, Ohio, for burial next to her father in Oak Hill Cemetery, where they were interred on 5 January 1933.

    In 2014, roughly one hundred people marked the anniversary of Entwistle's death by gathering in the parking lot of Beachwood Market in Hollywood to watch Thirteen Women on an outdoor screen. Proceeds from a raffle and from food and beverages sold at the screening were donated to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention in Entwistle's name.



     
  5. Doctor Omega

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    Gig Young (born Byron Elsworth Barr; November 4, 1913 – October 19, 1978) was an American film, stage, and television actor. Known mainly for second leads and supporting roles,

    Young won an Academy Award for his performance as a slimy dance-marathon emcee in the 1969 film They Shoot Horses, Don't They?

    An alcoholic, Young was implicated in the murder-suicide that resulted in the deaths of his wife and himself in 1978.


    Success and decline
    In 1955, Young became the host of Warner Bros. Presents, an umbrella title for three television series (Casablanca, Kings Row, and Cheyenne) that aired during the 1955–56 season on ABC Television.

    He played a supporting role the same year in the Humphrey Bogart thriller The Desperate Hours.

    Young is also remembered by many James Dean fans for the "driving safety" interview made shortly before Dean's fatal car accident in September, 1955.





    On the 1964–65 NBC series The Rogues, he shared appearances on a rotating basis with David Niven and Charles Boyer.

    Young won the Academy Award for his role as Rocky, the dance marathon emcee and promoter in the 1969 film They Shoot Horses, Don't They?

    According to his fourth wife, Elaine Williams, "What he was aching for, as he walked up to collect his Oscar, was a role in his own movie—one that they could finally call 'a Gig Young movie.'

    For Young, the Oscar was literally the kiss of death, the end of the line".

    Young himself had said to Louella Parsons, after failing to win in 1951, "so many people who have been nominated for an Oscar have had bad luck afterwards."

    After a substantial supporting role in Lovers and Other Strangers in 1970, alcoholism began to cost him roles.

    He collapsed on the set of the comedy film Blazing Saddles during his first day of shooting due to alcohol withdrawal, and was fired

    Young's last role was in the 1978 film Game of Death, released nearly six years after the film's star, Bruce Lee, died during production in 1973.

    Personal life

    Young was married five times; his first marriage to Sheila Stapler lasted seven years, ending in 1947.

    In 1950, he married Sophie Rosenstein, the resident drama coach at Paramount, who was several years Young's senior.

    She was soon diagnosed with cancer, and died just short of two years after the couple's wedding.

    After her death, Young was engaged to actress Elaine Stritch.

    He met actress Elizabeth Montgomery after she appeared in an episode of Warner Bros. Presents in 1956, and the two married later that year.

    In 1963, Montgomery divorced Young because of his alcoholism.

    Young married his fourth wife, real estate agent Elaine Williams, nine months after his divorce from Montgomery was final.

    Williams was pregnant with Young's child at the time and gave birth to his only child, Jennifer, in April 1964.

    After three years of marriage, the couple divorced.

    During a legal battle over child support with Williams, Young denied that Jennifer was his biological child.

    After five years of court battles, Young lost his case.

    On September 27, 1978, Young, age 64, married his fifth wife, a 31-year-old German magazine editor named Kim Schmidt.

    He met Schmidt in Hong Kong while working on Game of Death.

    Death

    On October 19, 1978, three weeks after his marriage to Schmidt, the couple was found dead at home in their Manhattan apartment.

    Police theorized that Young shot his wife and then turned the gun on himself.

    A motive for the murder-suicide was never made clear.

    Young was at one time under the care of the psychologist and psychotherapist Eugene Landy, who would later have his professional California medical license revoked amidst accusations of ethical violations and patient misconduct.

    Young was buried in the Green Hill Cemetery in Waynesville, North Carolina in his family's plot along with his parents, siblings and an uncle.

    Young's will, which covered a $200,000 estate, left his Academy Award to his agent, Martin Baum and Baum's wife, Bernice; however, Young's daughter Jennifer launched a campaign in the early 1990s to get the award back from his agent, and struck an agreement that she would get the award back upon the agent's death, which occurred in 2010.

    For his contribution to the television industry, Young has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6821 Hollywood Boulevard.



     

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