Recently Seen, Part 30 (August 2019)

clayton-12

Member: Rank 4
I hope the housekeeper doesn't show up. That would be too easy.
From here on in, all discussion of the movie really should be placed under cover of spoilers. I noticed no reviewer talks about anything that occurs this far in, Richard Gray in the Reel Bits had commented that Bong Joon-ho had written an open letter to reviewers asking them to refrain from doing so.

It feels like a totally different movie.
The whole structure reminded me a bit of a comment someone had made about Cold in July, something along the lines of "the viewer will feel like they walk out of a different movie to the one they walked into". But like that film, with Parasite I didn't feel there was any sleight of hand, cheap tricks or cheating to get there.
 

sitenoise

Member: Rank 5
Parasite

There's a flaw to the film but I can't put my finger on what it is. Maybe it's just a little hangover from the "Oh no! Don't shoot" part of the equation. But that's what Koreans do. "Hey! Great Shot!"

I could have done without the couple socio-politico-economico speeches, but whatever. They didn't take over even though the film sits on top of demonstrable class distinctions that, ya know, lead to the final act.

There is no not seeing this film as a masterclass by a group of players all playing at a high level, at the top of their game. One of many special shout-outs goes to Jang Hye-Jin. Who is she? Other film descriptions have her as "second sister-in-law" and "second daughter-in-law" and "meat restaurant middle age woman". Even here she's "Ki-Taek's wife". She practically pwns everybody else in this film ... except everybody else is doing their own pwning.

Ki-Taek's daughter, Park So-dam ... so damn, yeah ... looked familiar. I thought she was the girl from The Witch: Part 1. The Subversion. That was total pwnership. But no. She was one of the girls in The Silenced. Big whoop. And she played the Linda Blair role in The Priests, in which she kicked ass but it was only one scene, not a movie's worth.

I could go through the whole cast and give them love and bitch about how when you italicize something in this editor it keeps italicizing everything after it, and how much it pisses me off but ...

Let's just talk about the sex scene as a transition to talking about Cho Yeo-jeong. Only from Korea. "Go clockwise" FUCKING ITALICS.

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fuck


Remove formatting. OK

I have to leave this editor now. I'M ANGRY WITH IT. When anyone else watches this we can talk about it more. But stay on SPOILER ALERT !
 

clayton-12

Member: Rank 4
Only from Korea. "Go clockwise" FUCKING ITALICS.
When I initially quickly skimmed through your post, I read this as "ITALIANS" and though "oh no, he's finally flipped". I'm not sure whether there's some glitch or difference between browsers or something or other, I'm finding the editor behaves exactly like it did before.

I could have done without the couple socio-politico-economico speeches,
What in particular were you thinking of here? The only time I thought things became overtly political was in in the denouement, but I thought that was particularly well played. It kind of reminded me of what someone I know says, "endings are always the hardest part", and I liked the way we were dished up two endings - the Hollywood movie ending and the real life ending.
 

sitenoise

Member: Rank 5
Hmmm I don't know how to reply to a spoiler lol ...

Before I go under cover of spoiler, haven't you noticed the forum has changed a couple days ago? The red is darker and the emojis are huge.

Anyway (hope I get this right):
I think I may have been worried/annoyed during the drinking scene, because I don't like drinking scenes, and I feared I was losing the film, so the chit chat there made me grumpy. And there were sprinkles here and there. It's not bad, though, and it is relevant. And there was the housekeeper's imitation of North Korean News Broadcasters. I'm overly sensitive to speeches, forcing some point to be made (explaining your movie). I just want to watch people cook tofu and sing kumbaya :)

It's the ending that erased all reservations I had and uplifted the film. Endings are the hardest part. It seemed like Bong was searching, playing around, trying to figure out how to end it and then he finally ends it and you're punched in the face with the fact that he knew what he was doing all along. It really worked for me. Really made me realize that Bong's not messing around. Like Sono, for example might say "I wonder what will happen if I open this can of worms". Bong says: "We're opening this can of worms and this is precisely how the worms are going to dance".

Something like that.

I really was sort of slightly holding my breath, waiting to pounce from the drinking to the birthday party. That's kind of what I meant when I said "There's a flaw to the film but I can't put my finger on what it is". But the endings brought full redemption--even with the one big "Oh no!, Don't shoot!" moment. Bong made the shot.



 

clayton-12

Member: Rank 4
haven't you noticed the forum has changed a couple days ago? The red is darker and the emojis are huge.
Not just the forum ... the whole world started looking that way after all them socio-politico-economico speeches!

Huge emojis aside, I think the changes to the layout are generally positive - I left a comment here about the only functional matter that I thought was a step backwards.

the chit chat there made me grumpy. And there were sprinkles here and there. It's not bad, though, and it is relevant. And there was the housekeeper's imitation of North Korean News Broadcasters. I'm overly sensitive to speeches, forcing some point to be made (explaining your movie).
Possibly I'm more forgiving after the extreme lack of subtlety of Snowpiercer - I could accept characters vocalising their preoccupations about class because it seemed like the characters were doing that for themselves (and would do it in real life) rather than for the audience. It didn't cross over into the type of "Let me remind you that you are in a cell because you are a prisoner" nonsense type dialogue.
It seemed like Bong was searching, playing around, trying to figure out how to end it and then he finally ends it and you're punched in the face with the fact that he knew what he was doing all along. It really worked for me. Really made me realize that Bong's not messing around. Like Sono, for example might say "I wonder what will happen if I open this can of worms". Bong says: "We're opening this can of worms and this is precisely how the worms are going to dance".
<insert oversized thumbs-up emoji here>
 

sitenoise

Member: Rank 5
I left a comment here about the only functional matter that I thought was a step backwards.
Cool. Good post. I noticed that too when I couldn't figure out what you were talking about until I hovered over the word "here" and noticed the link. Figured it was one of those things that's so dumb it will be fixed shortly. No need to tell anyone about it lolsideshake.gif

lack of subtlety
It's because of Snowpiercer and Okja that I've been fearful Bong was going in a direction I'm not fond of. I probably only brought it up as a criticism of Parasite because I had prepared myself for it <giant laughing emoji> maybe disappointed he didn't give me enough to go on <super giant laughing emoji>
It's an authentic film 'about stuff'. Bong's craft is putting it, or using it, in a film that "heads off to god knows where".

 

divemaster13

Member: Rank 4
Actually, I wouldn't be surprised if you like this one ... I'm sure you'll find it ahem visually appealing. On the other hand, @divemaster13 would be bored stiff and ultimately have the same complaint he had about Memento Mori...
Ha. Not enough "lesbian stuff"? The trailer played it up somewhat. But damn, the girl looks like she's 12. At least in Memento Mori they were old enough to not ping too heavily on the perv radar. I"m not sure I would be bored, though. Something doesn't have to be "action-packed" to be interesting. But something has to keep me engaged. Plot, character, mystery, whatever. Beautiful scenery helps, but can't alone carry a film for me.
 

clayton-12

Member: Rank 4
Charlie’s Country (Rolf de Heer, 2013) is more than a showcase for the great actor David Gulpilil – as was well documented when the film was released, it also stands as a loosely biographical document of a man who became a household name without ever finding a place in mainstream Australia. Initially, the titular character is introduced as a loveable rogue, an everyman who doesn’t have life handed to him on a plate but nevertheless enjoys the simple things in life, who lives rough and wishes he had what the upper class have but nevertheless enjoys nothing more than a laugh with mates, who cheekily thumbs his nose at authority but generally gets on with everyone around him. But the odds are stacked against Charlie – the doctor says eat more healthily, so he goes bush to hunt for some proper food. Then the police take away his unlicenced gun. So he makes a spear to go hunting again. But the police don’t like him lugging a great big spear through the middle of town, and take that away too. So he gives up on modern society, and goes bush forever, to live in the old way.

All this plays out rather entertainingly, with a fair degree of comedy layered over poor Charlie’s misadventures. But the romantic notions of the film are soon abandoned, and the reality of an old man with a chest infection, living with minimal shelter in monsoonal rain, start to set in. The second half of the film is very intentionally way more difficult than the first, and becomes increasingly difficult to watch as it takes on the mindnumbing drudgery that comes with hopelessness.

It’s not the easiest of films to watch, but it is very good. Rolf de Heer is probably Australia’s greatest living filmmaker, but I doubt anyone will recognise this during his lifetime.
 
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