Fun Any Directors?

PF4Eva

Member: Rank 3
The clock is ticking, and I'm trying to archive as many valuable IMDb posts as possible. This one concerns selling copies of your movie at the premiere or a film festival.

by
worc508
» Sat Dec 24 2016 14:09:22 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since July 2005
Recently, it's been suggested to me that when I release my movie I should sell copies of it at the premiere. My thing is I want to hold off on selling the DVD til I'm done making the rounds on the festival circuit and I'm done shopping for a distributor.

I just wanted to know what everyone's thoughts on this is. Thank you!
by
Myosis1
» Tue Dec 27 2016 11:58:46 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2016
You selling DVDs in the lobby should not affect acceptance in any festivals or any future distribution deal.
by
RynoII
» Thu Jan 5 2017 12:54:47 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
I can't remember who the filmmaker was, but there was someone who did this like 10 years ago, and him selling copies, is what actually got the movie a distribution deal cause the right person came along and bought a copy, and that spread the movie around, and got a distribution deal after. So maybe it's a good thing in that case?
by
worc508
» Wed Feb 1 2017 09:42:53 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since July 2005
OK. I may consider this. Thank you.
by
dslah
» Tue Feb 7 2017 21:38:10 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since July 2006
Yeah, I did it at mine. We didn't have the DVD's printed yet, but we took pre-orders and sold them an empty case, then mailed the actual disc when they were ready a couple of weeks later. Was good, we sold a few hundred. It's also really nice to see people buy your movie after just having paid to see it. Plus you can sign it for them.

What do I know? I'm a bear. I suck the heads off of fish.
Brian Stoller wrote in Filmmaking for Dummies that he left a copy of a film of his at Blockbuster to see if anyone would notice. When he came back to retrieve it, the employee told him that someone had rented it. It later got legit distribution. However, Stoller doesn't necessarily recommend this method. But selling copies at your premiere shouldn't hurt.
 

PF4Eva

Member: Rank 3
Very important question. Invaluable advice.

by
RynoII
» Sun Jan 8 2017 21:00:07 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
I was seriously thinking of going this year for a film school that is a 6 month course, for 95OO (sic) USD.

But other people say that film school is a waist of time (sic), and no one cares if you have ever been to film school in the business. On the plus side, it could help you get projects made to put in your portfolio. Unless it's no different than doing it on your own. What do you think?
by
Arriflex74
» Mon Jan 9 2017 10:48:24 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
First of all, Nobody is going to respect a film program that is 6 months. That is a huge waste (note: not waist) of your time and money. If you want to do film school, research reputable programs like USC, NYU, FSU, UT Austin, etc. Programs with some reputation and recognition in the industry, and see which ones fit your interests.

Film school is worth what you put into it. It is about relationships and networking as much as it is about learning the craft. Look at Moonlight. All of the creative team that made it, the director, producer, cinematographer etc, went to FSU and maintained relationships to get them to where they won the Golden Globe for best dramatic feature.

Film school allows you to learn the fundamentals of the craft, while receiving feedback. you can do that on your own with your own projects, but you have to then get people to watch your stuff and try to evaluate the quality of their notes.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
 

PF4Eva

Member: Rank 3
by
RynoII
» Mon Jan 9 2017 15:46:09 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Post Edited:
Mon Jan 9 2017 17:29:31
Okay thanks. When I went to take the tour of the school though, and spoke to a couple of the students who graduated, they said that it was worth of it because of the networking, and because of the demo reels they made out of it, as class projects. The school helped get them the demo reels they needed and helped get access to good casts and crews which they would not have had access to on their own.

They said that the networking and demo reels were worth more to them in the industry, than getting a recognized diploma. So does that make a difference.

Also the places you mentioned I could not afford to go to, and I am not an American, so that makes it tricky.

Plus you said that film school is about networking and working on your craft, so isn't that what we will be doing in those six months?
[post deleted by the poster]

by
jackwareingfilms
» Tue Jan 10 2017 07:23:21 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since December 2015
I think the best part of film school is having access to film equipment, and a built in crew(other film students) available to shoot demos/shorts to show for future jobs. I got a couple years work in Czech Republic because of the films I shot at NYFA. However, Film school doesn't give, or teach you how to come up with cool stories, and they shouldn't be expected to. But, this is where I saw most students fail. They could master the technology much easier than me, but they had no (narrative) stories to tell. Writing, and learning to sketch storyboards is IMHO the most important thing for a (low budget) film director to know.
by
Arriflex74
» Tue Jan 10 2017 14:41:48 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
I'll pretty much echo what firearms posted.

"They said that the networking and demo reels were worth more to them in the industry, than getting a recognized diploma. So does that make a difference."

Networking and a reel are a couple of aspects of film programs, though to be honest what you make in film school is rarely worth putting on a professional reel. Its a good start, but not a complete professional reel. The reason for film school is to learn the craft, learn the rules of the medium and to learn from doing. Networking is a secondary benefit.

As to networking, is anybody from that program actually working in the business? What percentage of the alumni work in the field?

"Also the places you mentioned I could not afford to go to, and I am not an American, so that makes it tricky."

There are student visas, student loans and grants. So that's not an excuse. And there are plenty of good, real film schools in Canada. Look here: http://www.canadianfilm.com/schools/bc.html

"Plus you said that film school is about networking and working on your craft, so isn't that what we will be doing in those six months?"

There is a world of difference between a quick film workshop program that churns out anybody who can pay the tuition, and a longer established program where you have the time to learn the craft, learn from your classmates, and most importantly learn from your mistakes with constructive criticism. The quality of the faculty and the gear at real programs are going to be much better than workshop programs, as will be the quality of the students. If you have to apply and be chosen, chances are the caliber of student is going to be better than somebody who just paid the tuition and showed up.

You won't learn $10K worth of craft in 6 months. Period.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
 

PF4Eva

Member: Rank 3
And this is all just from the first page!

by
RynoII
» Tue Jan 10 2017 16:35:06 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Post Edited:
Tue Jan 10 2017 18:45:15
Okay thanks. To be honest, I have no idea if I want to take it or not. I could get student loans to go to a much more expensive school, but I was saving the majority of my money for other future film projects, and I was saving a large portion of it for my first feature film, which would be about 40K, to start off with, plus any more I could get when the time comes.

So is it worth taking all that money and putting it towards going to a much more expensive school, or is it worth using that money to make the film projects with?

As for if anyone in the school is working in the business, the guy I talked to there, said they hire people in the business to come in for that.

Here is the film school:

http://www.rais.ca/Motion Picture Arts

As far as getting visa and getting loans as a solution, last time I checked, loans have to be payed off, so I wonder if it's really worth it, rather than using that money to make future films.

On the other hand, there is a film program at a university one province over from you where graduates are seen consistently getting awards, international recognition and - most important - work within the industry.

Which film school is this? Are you talking about Vancouver Film school, cause I am two provinces over, and cannot afford to live in Vancouver.

Also, in the link that was provided before: http://www.canadianfilm.com/schools/bc.html

It says there that the Vancouver Film School course is only 15 months. Where as the one I am going to is six. You say that six months is not near enough time, but does 9 more months, really make all the difference?
by
Arriflex74
» Tue Jan 10 2017 20:56:52 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Post Edited:
Tue Jan 10 2017 21:03:49
That school, while putting up a good website, is nothing special and basically a community college at a massive rate hike. Nobody on faculty has any real experience, mostly industrial videos regional commercial work. The coursework is a plow-through as many types of formats as possible to seem to be "extensive", but in reality you're not getting any depth of technique or ability to refine and improve on genres. You're just skipping from one style to the next without ever getting a chance to improve. It boasts that "note taking time is minimal". That is terrible since notes, both in development and after production is how you learn this craft. That's a bad program model.

If you're interested in narrative filmmaking, find a program that does narrative film. FSU, USC and AFI teach traditional three-act narrative structure and you're given years to delve into learning narrative film structure and technique. NYU and UCLA lean more towards Indie, non-traditional filmmaking. UT Austin is more Indie and documentary based. SF State is more experimental centered. Hopefully you get the idea about how to start looking at film programs if you're still interested.

"It says there that the Vancouver Film School course is only 15 months. Where as the one I am going to is six. You say that six months is not near enough time, but does 9 more months, really make all the difference?"

Time is always essential when you are trying to learn a craft as diverse, artistic and technical as filmmaking.

"As far as getting visa and getting loans as a solution, last time I checked, loans have to be payed off, so I wonder if it's really worth it, rather than using that money to make future films."

nobody can make that call except for you. All I can say is that you've been posting on this board for a couple of years and haven't seemed to gain any concrete understanding of the craft. So maybe being immersed in a program where you're together with other filmmakers who can help you understand what you seem to not absorb from this board and overambitious ideas for your budgets and skill level could be helpful.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.

by
RynoII
» Tue Jan 10 2017 21:49:21 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks. Well I would like to save money for actually making movies so I really don't want to leave the country and be in debt on student loans. Everyone I talked to who is says they regretted doing it.

So far I have been learning pretty much always as a boom op so far on sets. So I can keep doing that as well as making my own shorts, or learn by doing a course like this, but I do not want to spend more than maybe 10K on the course, so I can have more for movie making afterwards.

You said that 6 months is not enough, yet 15 months is, in comparison? What is the approximate minimum do you think when looking into programs?

I also read a lot of reviews of Vancouver Film School, and almost all of them were negative, saying that the industry does not take VFS seriously, unless you have graduated in the special effects and audio departments. But not for people wanting to direct, such as myself.

So either I keep on making shorts, or take this course maybe or a course of an equivalent price, where I would make a few shorts out of it, and learn how, or at least I hope.

I was thinking about what you said about "note taking time is minimal". I also talked to the guy who ran the school, and I asked him if they go into teaching how to budget your filmmaking much... He said that they can modify the course so I do learn budgeting, but "most students fall asleep when it comes to learning budgeting though". This statement also made me feel like I wasn't being totally sold on the program as well.
by
Arriflex74
» Wed Jan 11 2017 07:40:31 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Well I would like to save money for actually making movies so I really don't want to leave the country and be in debt on student loans. Everyone I talked to who is says they regretted doing it.

That is everyone's dream, to just make their own movies. The problem is that if you don't know how to learn from your mistakes, you're just going to keep throwing your money away on bad projects that don't improve.

You also don't have to leave the country to get an education. I linked to Canadian film programs. All I was trying to show you is that not all film programs are the same. You have to do the investigating and ask the critical questions about what you want from a film program, what the program offers and value for money.

You said that 6 months is not enough, yet 15 months is, in comparison? What is the approximate minimum do you think when looking into programs?

It isn't a quantifiable variable. It all depends on the program, but less than a year is a waste of time and money in my experience. It takes time to learn this craft, and you are always learning. Film school gives you the fundamentals of the medium and the start of a skill-set that you take out into the world and expand upon.

What you need to look at is; how is the program structured, how many sets do you get to work on, what is the programs emphasis, what is the quality of the gear, facilities and faculty, and how many of the alumni are working in the industry.

Here's the thing about film school, it really exposes you to the different jobs on set. At FSU we had a class of 22 students, about 18 said they wanted to be directors at the start of their coursework. Half-way through, only about 8 remained on track for directing. All the rest of us realized we preferred either cinematography, editing, sound design or producing to directing. While there I directed 3 short films, produced 4, edited 4 and shot 8, while being crew in various position on about 100 others.

I was thinking about what you said about "note taking time is minimal". I also talked to the guy who ran the school, and I asked him if they go into teaching how to budget your filmmaking much... He said that they can modify the course so I do learn budgeting, but "most students fall asleep when it comes to learning budgeting though". This statement also made me feel like I wasn't being totally sold on the program as well.

That speaks volumes about the program, but it speaks louder to the caliber of student that goes to this program. IF they have to modify the program to teach you the basics, then walk away.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
 

PF4Eva

Member: Rank 3
From page 2

by
RynoII
» Wed Jan 11 2017 15:27:11 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks. Well I wasn't planning on putting all the experience and practice I would get out of the school. So far I have been a boom op on other people's movies, and I thought that maybe I would go into the school being a boom op, and editor, since that is what I am most experienced at so far.

I wasn't planning on relying on the school to learn the entire craft, as I have already learned a lot just from making my own projects, and working on other people's. But I thought that school might teach me some things that maybe I couldn't learn on sets. Not all, but some, that was worth it.

Unless I am wrong and maybe none of it is worth it at all...
[post deleted by the poster]

by
RynoII
» Wed Jan 11 2017 17:55:25 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks. The recording studio class, is a completely different course though, and it's not part of the motion picture arts program. It's a separate program entirely, they said.

Also, when you say there is a better school one province over, which school are we talking about here? I truly am lost. The one province over from me is Manitoba, and I do not know of any schools in Manitoba. Which is it? I can't find it, so could you please tell me?
by
Arriflex74
» Wed Jan 11 2017 21:44:49 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
The recording studio class, is a completely different course though, and it's not part of the motion picture arts program. It's a separate program entirely, they said.

The point the FT is trying to get across is that the school is primarily a audio recording arts program that recently started a motion picture program. Thus the motion picture program is heavily borrowing from the recording program in structure, and not really a full film program in its own right.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
by
RynoII
» Sun Jan 15 2017 15:01:20 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Oh okay, I thought it seemed like a lot of it was devoted to video, cause when you tour the school, they have a lot of video equipment and green screen/FX rooms, and just departments devoted to video related matters. I don't think they could borrow from the audio department much cause the audio department needs there resources for their program as well, so it looks like both parts of the building are separate completely, from when I took the tour.

I am heavy into audio when it comes to filmmaking though, since sound is half the movie, so I thought that if they are heavy into audio as well, isn't that a good thing, since sound is half the movie?

I talked to one of the students so far and she said that she learned a lot and made good connections, so it was totally worth the money for her, so I wonder how bad could the school be, if one student so far actually really likes it. But I am having second thoughts now.
by
Arriflex74
» Sun Jan 15 2017 16:44:52 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
I am heavy into audio when it comes to filmmaking though, since sound is half the movie, so I thought that if they are heavy into audio as well, isn't that a good thing, since sound is half the movie?

It is good to have a good sound department within a good film program, but what we noticed on the school's page is that their film program seems lifted from the recording school, and not a real quality film program in and of itself (as we wrote about earlier. it's lots of styles with no depth or chance to improve on a style. Just bam, bam, bam on to the next project without ever learning what worked and didn't work on your shoot. Plus, no class time and them admitting that they would have to make adjustments to teach you how to produce and budget. Massive red flags!).

I talked to one of the students so far and she said that she learned a lot and made good connections, so it was totally worth the money for her, so I wonder how bad could the school be, if one student so far actually really likes it. But I am having second thoughts now.

Yeah, one person out of how many graduates? You can find one person who thinks anything is positive, doesn't mean that it really is. Again, what is the percentage of grads working professionally in the industry? What is this school's reputation within the industry? So you would be spending nearly $2000/month on something that is on par with a community college program.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
 

PF4Eva

Member: Rank 3
by
RynoII
» Sun Jan 15 2017 16:51:44 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
For sure, I would have to find other grad's to talk to. Not sure where to look though. I thought that the fact that they were willing to modify the program for me, was not a red flag, but a good sign, cause it shows they are willing to do that for a student's advantage of a particular area, that student might find useful.
[double post by RynoII]

by
Arriflex74
» Sun Jan 15 2017 20:45:13 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Post Edited:
Mon Jan 16 2017 01:47:02
For sure, I would have to find other grad's to talk to. Not sure where to look though.

Ask them for an alumni list. You say you've been helping out on other people's films. Ask them if any of them have heard of or worked with people from this program. Again, this isn't hard. Start thinking.

I thought that the fact that they were willing to modify the program for me, was not a red flag, but a good sign, cause it shows they are willing to do that for a student's advantage of a particular area, that student might find useful.

The simple fact that fundamental aspects to the craft like producing and budgeting are NOT part of the regular curriculum is a huge issue, and a further example that this isn't a serious film program, along with all the other issues FT and I have pointed out to you in this thread. Don't know how many other ways and times I can say it before it sinks in. This is an overpriced community college level program. Take some time, do the research, ask the right questions and quit looking for the quick and easy way to learn this craft.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
by
RynoII
» Mon Jan 16 2017 22:05:07 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks. Well I have been researching and couldn't find any graduates of the program so far, but one thing a lot of film school graduates say, is that even though the degree is useless, and they could have used that money to make their own movies, it was still worth going, cause of the connections they make. And that is what I am lacking is connections.

So I was wondering if it's still worth going for that reason? As for going to a more expensive one, you say this one is overpriced, but other main ones in Canada are higher, and I could not afford it.

So it's pretty much either go to this one and hope the connections are worth it, or just use the money to make my own short films, or add the money to a feature. Which option do you think is best?
Page 3

by
RynoII
» Mon Jan 16 2017 22:05:07 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks. Well I have been researching and couldn't find any graduates of the program so far, but one thing a lot of film school graduates say, is that even though the degree is useless, and they could have used that money to make their own movies, it was still worth going, cause of the connections they make. And that is what I am lacking is connections.

So I was wondering if it's still worth going for that reason? As for going to a more expensive one, you say this one is overpriced, but other main ones in Canada are higher, and I could not afford it.

So it's pretty much either go to this one and hope the connections are worth it, or just use the money to make my own short films, or add the money to a feature. Which option do you think is best?
by
Arriflex74
» Mon Jan 16 2017 23:03:02 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Post Edited:
Mon Jan 16 2017 23:13:10
Well I have been researching and couldn't find any graduates of the program so far

Your first red flag! Good programs that have students working in the industry will always flaunt those students.

it was still worth going, cause of the connections they make.

Total BS. Connections only work if the school puts out quality graduates.

I've been in this profession for almost 20 years and NOBODY I've worked with has attended a program like the one you're jazzed about (or they are too embarrassed about going to one to admit it).

See where this is going?

And that is what I am lacking is connections.

No. What you're lacking is understanding of the medium. That's where a GOOD film program could help. With quality come the connections via the alumni.

So I was wondering if it's still worth going for that reason? As for going to a more expensive one, you say this one is overpriced, but other main ones in Canada are higher, and I could not afford it.

Dear god! Just go to a state university with a media program and a film theory class and you'll have a better education at a lower cost than this program.

Simple rule of thumb, if you simply have to sign up, pay the tuition and don't have to apply and get accepted, the program is a waste of time and money. But if you need reassurances about every little decision, after knowledgable people have given you sound advice, just go and hope for the best.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
 

PF4Eva

Member: Rank 3
by
RynoII
» Tue Jan 17 2017 05:31:08 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks. Why is it that a a medial program and a film theory class, would be better?
[post deleted by the poster]

by
RynoII
» Tue Jan 17 2017 13:23:13 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks. But I was told before that BA's and majors don't mean anything in the filmmaking world, wouldn't I be going for other reasons, other than the BA and major, if that's the case?
[two posts deleted by the posters]

by
RynoII
» Tue Jan 17 2017 17:44:35 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Post Edited:
Tue Jan 17 2017 22:30:44
Okay thanks. I just want to make the best decision based on experienced people who could probably give me better advice... Does this school look any better?

http://saskpolytech.ca/programs-and-courses/programs/Media-Arts-Production-Certificate.aspx
by
Arriflex74
» Tue Jan 17 2017 20:30:09 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Hard to say. Their website is kind of nebulous, non-specific as to classes. The fact that they don't have any faculty listed is worrisome.

Overall, if you can't leave Saskatchewan, this is the better program:

https://www.uregina.ca/mediaartperformance/areas-study/film/index.html

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
[post deleted by the poster]

P4

by
RynoII
» Tue Jan 17 2017 22:36:22 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Post Edited:
Tue Jan 17 2017 22:44:44
Okay thanks, but there are independent filmmaker here who have made feature films cause they don't need the tax credit. They have used programs like kickstarter, and other ways of getting money from outside of Saskatchewan.

You don't need a tax credit break from Saskatchewan to make a movie, when you can get money from other places through networking. The reason why I am here, is because I know some actors who I have worked with before, and I stick around to work with them again. However, I was just wondering what school is worth it here; I wasn't inquiring about the government tax credit. Plus with online networking, filmmakers that I have worked under before, are not relying on local government tax credits. Do you think the tax credits effected the schools as well?

Either way, I would only travel outside of Saskatchewan to shoot a feature film, in the future, but I wouldn't be able to afford to move for school. But I am perfectly willing to travel outside to make a movie, I just didn't want to go to school outside of.

You say that the University of Regina program is much better. What is it about it, that makes it better?
[post deleted by the poster]

by
Arriflex74
» Wed Jan 18 2017 12:39:49 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
You say that the University of Regina program is much better. What is it about it, that makes it better?

I'll admit to knowing nothing about the program. All I can do is look at the program layout at UR, and it looks more like the film programs you see at top film schools here. It is similar in structure to NYU and FSU. They provide course descriptions and tracks. They show you the faculty so you can decide if these are people under whom you would like to study. The other programs you referenced are more like NYFA and early Full Sail workshop programs, which are just not well regarded in the industry.

So this is where you need to start your independent, critical thinking and research about the programs. We can't help you anymore, because it is down to you doing the legwork and the research.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
 

PF4Eva

Member: Rank 3
[post deleted by the poster]

by
RynoII
» Thu Jan 19 2017 21:41:36 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks, for looking at it and for all your input. I emailed the U of R about it before though, asking them certain questions, and they never got back to me. So I didn't have a good feeling about them compared to other schools which gave me a whole lot more information. I can email them again, but if they don't get back to me again, is that a bad sign?
by
RynoII
» Thu Jan 19 2017 22:07:13 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
I could move to go school, but is it worth going to school to make the connections? I thought I could make the connections in other ways, even in other areas. But if it's worth going to school for the connections than I could move. Does it have to Vancouver or Ontario though?
by
Arriflex74
» Fri Jan 20 2017 10:28:33 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
It's a state school. One email isn't necessarily going to get attention, especially if you use the same grammar and punctuation you use on these boards.

How about calling the department and scheduling a tour? Actually see the facility. Meet the faculty and students, and get a feel for the program. Hell, do that with any school or program you're seriously looking to attend, even those overpriced workshops you're interested in. It is your money, your education and your future. So don't rely on one email to define your decision.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
by
RynoII
» Fri Jan 20 2017 21:19:51 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks a lot for your input. After doing some research, I won't be able to afford a house in that city it turns out, so I am hesitant to go now. But I will find out more about the program first, to see exactly how much it is...
[post deleted by the poster]

by
Arriflex74
» Sat Jan 21 2017 06:04:39 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
People starting out can't afford to live in New York or Los Angeles either, but they figure out how to make it work because it is what they want.

This may not be the career path for you. As a film maker 90% of your job is problem solving. If you want to be a director, 99% of your job is problem solving. That just seems like something you can't do based on your activity on these boards, and especially on this thread. Once I pointed you in the direction of what sort of questions to ask of programs, and what to look for in a film school, this thread should have ended. But the fact is that you can't extrapolate out and start to problem solve on your own. Nobody is going to trust you to be a director if you can't even do simple problem solving, and nobody is going to hire you for their crew if you need to be told what to do at every step, because you're a burden and a time suck on other crew member's time and energy.

Example: can't afford a house in Regina, get an apartment or get roommates. See if any current students are looking for roommates. Maybe the university offers student housing. Maybe the school offers a work/study program to help defer some of the costs. Maybe the school offers scholarships. All this I came up with after being awake for 5 minutes.

best of luck.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
 

PF4Eva

Member: Rank 3
by
RynoII
» Sat Jan 21 2017 10:34:02 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks. I don't know anyone in Regina so I will have to look. Also, in order to solve the problem, are their any online filmmaking school programs worth taking, where I would learn more than what there is to offer in my city?
by
John-PaulJones
» Sun Jan 22 2017 14:12:05 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since October 2014
Seriously. Pick one. ANY one.

GO TO FILM SCHOOL.

Your friends are idiots; you listen to advice from random strangers and you have now just pissed off WORKING PROFESSIONALS who have tried and tried to help you. You ignored their advice, asked the same questions over and over again - THAT THEY TOOK THE TIME OUT OF THEIR BUSY LIVES TO ANSWER - and now they have had enough of you. Some have deleted their comments and moved on.

You have NO CLUE whatsoever who the people were that you were talking to. I have been fortunate to have worked in the film industry here in California for many years and have amassed a nice list of credits. Those WORKING PROFESSIONALS you have now pissed off have HUNDREDS AND HUNDREDS of credits.

I have no idea why they continue to offer advice to someone who won't take it, and I respect them for it, but enough is enough. If this is a little hobby, then stand under a cold shower and tear up hundred dollar bills instead. It will feel the same; the food will be just as good, and at the end of the day, you will be cleaner.

You need to decide if this is going to be a hobby or going to be a career. If it's a hobby, then waste your money, have fun and don't think for one minute that you will have absolutely nothing to show for it except bills ten years from now.

If this is a career, find a GOOD film school; find a way to attend, and GO.

It is obvious you just talk and talk and can't do the walk. Either go away from these boards or start learning your craft the right way. There are many other message boards on IMDB for losers; these SHOP TALK boards are for professionals (or those who want to become professionals.)
by
RynoII
» Thu Jan 26 2017 00:44:12 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Oh sorry, I didn't mean to piss off anyone. I thank everyone for the advice, I really. It's much appreciated. It's just some of the people in the industry I have asked saying film school is a waste of time, and I might as well use the money to make short films, so I was undecided which root to take therefore, that's all.
by
Arriflex74
» Thu Jan 26 2017 20:38:19 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Post Edited:
Thu Jan 26 2017 20:39:41
It's just some of the people in the industry I have asked saying film school is a waste of time, and I might as well use the money to make short films, so I was undecided which root to take therefore, that's all.

That is a total BS answer because we have always said that school is a personal choice and dependent on how you learn best. It isn't for everyone, but it isn't an objective "waste of time" either. It worked for Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, George Lucas, Spike Lee and many thousands of others. For as many others it isn't worth their while and they didn't need it.

So that answer you gave is complete crap. Only you can determine whether film school is right for you, and you get out of it what you put into it.

After that, we gave you the tools to determine for yourself the quality of programs. You continually showed a lack of initiative or problem-solving skills to take matters into your own hands. Instead wanting us, people you don't know, to hand hold you and tell you what actions to take. So excuse and explain all you want, but it's time to make your own decisions. We're done helping.

Never go with a hippy to a second location.
by
RynoII
» Sun Jan 29 2017 00:18:04 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Okay thanks, for the help. Sorry I don't mean to drive the advice away, I am just indecisive about it, that's all. I will take it all into account. Thanks again.
by
RynoII
» Mon Feb 6 2017 14:52:26 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
I was wondering, when we talked about how the course was 11K, you realize I was talking Canadian currency and not American right?
by
firearms trainer
» Mon Feb 6 2017 17:10:21 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since August 2001
You are on your own. You blew it.

You are trying to be a submarine commander without learning how to effing swim. And you want to know the best kind of sonar to use to track Russian submarines. One person told you to save the money on active sonar and just go passive; another person told you joining the Navy first was for pussies.

LEARN YOUR CRAFT.

All your questions will be answered three years later.
by
RynoII
» Mon Feb 6 2017 21:35:35 Flag ▼ | Reply |
IMDb member since May 2006
Post Edited:
Mon Feb 6 2017 21:38:46
Okay thanks for the help. I understand that I may have to a lot of questions about the school since I am uncertain. But I feel that there is no need for the over the top submarine analogies and all that. Getting dramatic about it doesn't really do anything, with all do (sic) respect :).

But yes I will learn the craft better, whether or not I decide to go to school. Thanks for the push.
 

Doctor Omega

Administrator
Staff member
VIP
 
Top