Review Dubious BONDS!

Discussion in 'Ian Fleming' started by Doctor Omega, Mar 19, 2017.

  1. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    Return of the Man from U.N.C.L.E.: The Fifteen-Years-Later Affair is a 1983 American made-for-television action-adventure film based on the 1964–1968 television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. starring Robert Vaughn and David McCallum reprising the roles they had originated on that program. Several of the crew from the series also worked on the film, which was produced by Viacom rather than Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Leo G. Carroll had died in 1972, so Patrick Macnee was recruited to appear as an entirely different character, Sir John Raleigh, who had presumably taken over as Number 1 of Section I, the Director of U.N.C.L.E., after Alexander Waverly had died, and Carroll's photograph was displayed prominently in many scenes that featured Macnee's Sir John

    George Lazenby's cameo appearance as 'J.B.' – driving an Aston Martin and complete with an On Her Majesty's Secret Service name check – made 1983 the year of three Bonds, with the 'battle' at the box office between Roger Moore's sixth outing (Octopussy) and Sean Connery's return to the role after 12 years (in Never Say Never Again).






     
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    #1 Doctor Omega, Mar 19, 2017
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  2. Amyghost

    Amyghost Member: Rank 3

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    I really want to see this one again. I recall it wasn't particularly well reviewed when it aired, but from what I remember of it, it was fun--and still way better than that awful recent theatrical version.
     
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  3. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    O.K. Connery is a 1967 Italian spaghetti spy film shot in Technicolor and Techniscope directed by Alberto De Martino.

    The Spy-Fi plot involves the brother of the British spy James Bond, played by Neil Connery (the actual brother of the official franchise's star Sean) who is obliged to take the lead in foiling a world-domination plot.

    The film's cast included several actors from the official James Bond film series, Thunderball's Adolfo Celi, From Russia with Love's Daniela Bianchi, Dr. No's Anthony Dawson, the official M Bernard Lee and Moneypenny Lois Maxwell as well as the producer's wife Agata Flori, Gina Lollobrigida's cousin Guido Lollobrigida and Yasuko Yama (aka Yee-Wah Young[4] and Yee-Wah Yang) then in the publicity spotlight due to her relationship with James Mason.

    She appeared as a bath girl in You Only Live Twice under the name Yee-Wah Yang.

    The film received generally negative reviews from the New York Times, Variety and the Monthly Film Bulletin with the latter two reviews noting that the film could leave audiences with unintentional laughter at its ineptitude.

    The film was featured on the film-mocking television series Mystery Science Theater 3000 in 1993.



     
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    #3 Doctor Omega, Sep 25, 2017
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  4. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    Fan theory: Is Sean Connery's The Rock a secret James Bond sequel?
    Here's where 007s go when they retire.

    http://www.digitalspy.com/movies/ja...onnery-the-rock-james-bond-sequel-fan-theory/


    landscape-1469116731-sean-connery-james-bond-the-rock.jpg


    The fan theory claims Sean Connery's former British secret service agent Captain John Patrick Mason is actually 007.

    Connery reportedly once joked that he loved how The Rock gave him a final chance to play James Bond again. But could his comments have been more literal than anyone realised?







     
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  5. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    I like to think that this theory can stand as canon.

    Am happy to believe that Sean did yet one more BOND film. :emoji_alien:
     
  6. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    Spy Hard is a 1996 American spy comedy film parody starring Leslie Nielsen and Nicollette Sheridan, parodying James Bond movies and other action films. The introduction to the movie is sung by comedy artist "Weird Al" Yankovic. It was the first film to be written by Jason Friedberg and Aaron Seltzer. The film's title is a pun of Die Hard. The film was directed by Rick Friedberg and produced by Doug Draizin and Jeffrey Konvitz.

    The film was released by Buena Vista Pictures on May 24, 1996, receiving generally negative reviews from critics. While many praised Nielsen's acting and its humor, most found the script, story and its direction disappointing. The film eventually grossed $26 million against a production budget of $18 million.







    Title sequence
    "Weird Al" Yankovic sings the title song and directed the title sequence. It is a parody of title sequences from the James Bond films designed by Maurice Binder, specifically 1965's Thunderball, complete with multiple colored backgrounds, silhouetted figures, women dancing with guns, and "wavy" text. Additionally, an urban legend states that during the recording of the theme to Thunderball, Tom Jones held the song's final note long enough to pass out. Yankovic holds it so long that his head explodes. Originally, Yankovic had planned to loop the note to the required length, but in the studio, he discovered he was able to hold the note long enough that no looping was required.[2] The sequence was later included on "Weird Al" Yankovic: The Ultimate Video Collection, although, for legal reasons, all credits and titles had to be taken out, excluding that of the film and of Yankovic himself.



     
  7. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    Danger: Diabolik (Italian: Diabolik) is a 1968 action film directed and co-written by Mario Bava, based on the Italian comic series Diabolik by Angela and Luciana Giussani.[2] The film is about a criminal named Diabolik (John Phillip Law), who plans large-scale heists for his girlfriend Eva Kant (Marisa Mell). Diabolik is pursued by Inspector Ginko (Michel Piccoli), who blackmails the gangster Ralph Valmont (Adolfo Celi) into catching Diabolik for him.

    An adaptation of the comics was originally envisioned by producer Tonino Cervi. Cervi hired director Seth Holt and began producing the film as an international co-production, with a cast that included Jean Sorel, Elsa Martinelli and Gilbert Roland. After producer Dino De Laurentiis saw the footage that had been shot, he halted production on the film, had a new screenplay developed, and hired a new director and cast. This resulted in Bava directing the film on a much lower budget, with more well-known actors taking smaller roles. Many of the cast and crew members were brought in from Barbarella, De Laurentiis' other comic book adaptation of that year.

    Upon its theatrical release, Danger: Diabolik performed below De Laurentiis' expectations at the box office, and received negative reviews from The New York Times and Variety. With the re-evaluation of Bava's filmography, contemporary reception of the film has been more positive, with critics praising its visuals, the performances of Law and Mell, and the score by Ennio Morricone. Two new adaptations of Diabolik were announced in the 2000s, but neither went into production.


    Cast


     
  8. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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    Reception

    From contemporary reviews, Howard Thompson of The New York Times gave a brief negative review of Danger: Diabolik referring to the film as "infantile junk."[23] Film critic Roger Ebert gave the film a two and a half star rating out of four, stating that he felt it was better than the other Dino De Laurentiis production Barbarella, but that it was "long and eventually loses track of itself."[24] Variety gave the film a negative review, calling it a "dull Dino De Laurentiis programmer" whose "izarre sets, poor process work, static writing and limp direction spell pure formula fare for lowercase grind bookings."[25] The Monthly Film Bulletin gave the film a positive review, noting that: "Bava's superb visual sense stands him in good stead in this comic-strip adventure which looks like a brilliant pastiche of the best of everything in anything from James Bond to Matt Helm."[26]

    In a 2012 issue of Film International, John Berra described the film's contemporary reception, noting that the film had initially "been left to languish in obscurity since its staggered international release at the end of the 1960s" and that it "mostly existed as a kitsch reference point or as an easy target for tongue-in-cheek parody."[27] Examples of this are seen in the Beastie Boys music video for "Body Movin'" (1998) and the film being featured on the final episode of Mystery Science Theater 3000 shown on Sci-Fi Channel on August 8, 1999.[27][28][29] The television show provided mocking commentary over a film interspersed with sketches while Beastie Boys member Adam Yauch found the film to be "campy in a way, but not in a bad way" and describes the acting and direction as "ridiculous" but with the set design being "so over the top the acting is appropriate."[27][30] The film's status as a cult film grew gradually as studies of Bava's career began, and with its 2007 DVD release which explored the film's relation to its comic book roots.[31] Berra described the film as being "warmly received" by the Internet community, who routinely embraces comic book adaptations and seeks to adopt films that have been neglected by popular audiences.[31]

    Glenn Erickson discussed Danger: Diabolik twice on DVD Talk (in 1998 and 2005);[20][22] describing the film as a guilty pleasure, he praised Bava's stylized visuals, noting his use of bright colours, elaborate sets and wide lenses, "giving almost every shot a distorted depth that lends the film a consistent comic book dynamism".[22] While noting the minimal characterization of Diabolik himself (describing him as "the final distillation of the idea that we love criminals because we secretly admire the transgressions they represent"), he felt that Marisa Mell's portrayal of Eva presented her as loving Diabolik "on a romantic plane of surprising believability. [...] [Her] adoring faithfulness is so physical and pure that the sincerity of their farewell ("You'll not be alone while I live!") is tenderly affecting."[22] Erickson also admired Terry-Thomas' campy portrayal of the Minister of Interior, describing his news conference as "easily outdo[ing] TV's Batman." Thematically, he has noted that Diabolik's desire to steal for himself and Eva "represent the ultimate end of materialist consumerism", as well as "the rollercoaster Italian politics of the time, which seemed to flip-flop from conservative to socialist and back again on a weekly basis;" Erickson also mentions that "Diabolik's world stresses strangely fetishistic surfaces and textures, backing up film theorist Raymond Durgnat's assertion that the psychic land of pulp fantasy is fundamentally a sexual one."[22]

    Video Librarian noted that the film was "guaranteed to delight viewers whose tastes run to the outré", praising Ennio Morricone's score, Law and Mell's acting, and noting that the "real star is Bava" stating that "the film is colorful almost to the point of garishness."[19] Cinefantastique also discussed the film's visuals, noting that: "[Bava's] color rich, brilliantly artificial-looking compositions were the cinematic equivalent of comic book art even before he tackled the form." The magazine also found that the special effects rivalled those of Ken Adam, who worked on the Bond films.[18] The review also praised Law's work in the film noting his "amazingly expressive eyebrows" and declared the film as "1960s pop-culture heaven."[18] Ignatiy Vishnevetsky (The A.V. Club) compared the film to Barbarella, opining that Diabolik had "a sense of infectious, amoral fun" which Barbarella lacks.[21] He declared the film to be among "the definitive touchstones of Euro pulp."[21] Empire included the film on its list of the top 500 greatest films. They described the movie as "thin as a poster, but still amazing cinema – a succession of striking, kinetic, sexy, absurd images accompanied by a one-of-a-kind Ennio Morricone score that revels in its casual anarchy."






    And the Theme Song... "DEEP DOWN"



     
  9. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Moderator

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