alpha128

Member: Rank 3
This movie has a MAJOR plothole. The housing development is built on the site of a graveyard, but apparently NO special measures are taken in design and construction. The filmmakers could have hinted at the eventual reveal, by dropping a line of dialogue stating that all the homes were built on slabs. But IIRC, the homes have basements. And one of them has an in ground swimming pool! Honestly, how could you dig a swimming pool in a graveyard and not unearth bodies?!? The implausibility of this scenario always bothered me, and I never watched any of the sequels.
 

Doctor Omega

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I never noticed that glaring plothole. But yes, good point!


Then there was that whole business of the Poltergeist "Curse" of course......




I don't know how the cast and crew of the recent remake are doing so far, in this department....
 

Hux

Member: Rank 6
I find it hard to watch now after what happened to the little girl.

Though weirdly, I have no problem watching Mary Poppins after what happened to the young boy.

I think it's the context.
 

Carol

Member: Rank 5
how could you dig a swimming pool in a graveyard and not unearth bodies?!?
Hi Alpha, good question. Engage your deepest cynicism about rogue operatives in the construction trade - think churlish, money-grubbing cover up. They KNEW and pretended they'd found nothing! Thus they hacked off the ancient spirits (who, oddly knew how TVs worked but we'll let that one go)
Accept that the site developers were not good citizens, and it all makes sense.
Trust me, I'm not just a Carol - I'm a Carol Ann, AND and have heard ALL the jokes!
 

alpha128

Member: Rank 3
Hi Alpha, good question. Engage your deepest cynicism about rogue operatives in the construction trade - think churlish, money-grubbing cover up. They KNEW and pretended they'd found nothing! Thus they hacked off the ancient spirits (who, oddly knew how TVs worked but we'll let that one go)
Accept that the site developers were not good citizens, and it all makes sense.
I know the site developers were not good citizens.

But what about the construction workers who were actually doing the digging? I can easily imagine a scenario where they threatened to blow the whistle unless they were paid to keep silent. And if so, by the time the company finished paying all that hush money, they could have just paid to give the bodies a proper burial somewhere else.

This is a plothole big enough to bury a LOT of bodies in!
 

TheSowIsMine

What an excellent day for an exorcism
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I always wondered how the movie would have turned out if Tobe Hooper actually got to direct it.
I do like the family dynamic in this one.

I find it hard to watch now after what happened to the little girl.
Did you know that the girl who played the oldest daughter was killed by her boyfriend?
 

Carol

Member: Rank 5
This is a plothole big enough to bury a LOT of bodies in!
Yes, the way you tell it. Not sure where you are in the world but when (I'm sure it won't be "if") they remake it, it should be under contemporary English law - before the first sod is turned for development you have to bring in the field archaeologists for a survey - happens all the time in the City - demolish something old - newer building go higher so foundations go deeper - hit the Roman layer, emergency digs have to be scheduled. So the pissed off spirits would have to haunt the Museum of London instead, where their mortal remains would be deposited - still very satisfying in its way...

curse rumours about the film
I never knew that - but then if Macbeth was anywhere near as cursed as IT'S supposed to be, there's be far fewer actors and plenty of work to go round for all of them
 

Doctor Omega

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Did Spielberg Direct Poltergeist?


An overview of Steven Spielberg's sometimes controversial involvement in the creation of Poltergeist.

Creative credit

A clause in his contract with Universal Studios prevented Spielberg from directing any other film while preparing E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.[6] Time and Newsweek tagged the summer of 1982 "The Spielberg Summer" because E.T. and Poltergeist were released a week apart in June. As such a marketable name, some began to question Spielberg's role during production. Suggestions that Spielberg had greater directorial influence than the credits suggest were aided by his comments:

Tobe isn't… a take-charge sort of guy. If a question was asked and an answer wasn't immediately forthcoming, I'd jump in and say what we could do. Tobe would nod agreement, and that became the process of collaboration.

The Directors Guild of America "opened an investigation into the question of whether or not Hooper's official credit was being denigrated by statements Spielberg has made, apparently claiming authorship." Co-producer Frank Marshall told the Los Angeles Times that "the creative force of the movie was Steven. Tobe was the director and was on the set every day. But Steven did the design for every storyboard and he was on the set every day except for three days when he was in Hawaii with Lucas." However, Hooper stated that he "did fully half of the storyboards."[6]

The Hollywood Reporter printed an open letter from Spielberg to Hooper in the week of the film's release.

Regrettably, some of the press has misunderstood the rather unique, creative relationship which you and I shared throughout the making of Poltergeist.

I enjoyed your openness in allowing me… a wide berth for creative involvement, just as I know you were happy with the freedom you had to direct Poltergeist so wonderfully.

Through the screenplay you accepted a vision of this very intense movie from the start, and as the director, you delivered the goods. You performed responsibly and professionally throughout, and I wish you great success on your next project.[8]
Several members of the Poltergeist cast and crew have over the years consistently stated that Spielberg was the 'de facto director' of the picture, while other actors have claimed Hooper directed the film. In a 2007 interview with Ain't It Cool News, Rubinstein discussed her recollections of the shooting process. She said that "Steven directed all six days" that she was on set: "Tobe set up the shots and Steven made the adjustments." She also alleged that Hooper "allowed some unacceptable chemical agents into his work," and felt that "Tobe was only partially there."[9]

According to the Blumhouse Productions website, Poltergeist assistant cinematographer John R. Leonetti reported that Spielberg directed the film more so than Hooper, stating:

Hooper was so nice and just happy to be there. He creatively had input. Steven developed the movie, and it was his to direct, except there was anticipation of a director’s strike, so he was “the producer” but really he directed it in case there was going to be a strike and Tobe was cool with that. It wasn’t anything against Tobe. Every once in a while, he would actually leave the set and let Tobe do a few things just because. But really, Steven directed it.




 

Doctor Omega

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Did you know that the girl who played the oldest daughter was killed by her boyfriend?

MV5BMjE1NzEzNTI4MV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjgyMTcxOA@@._V1_.jpg


Dominique Ellen Dunne (November 23, 1959 – November 4, 1982) was an American actress. She appeared in several films and television series from 1979 to 1982, but was best known for portraying Dana Freeling in the 1982 horror film Poltergeist.

On October 30, 1982, Dunne was strangled by her ex-boyfriend, John Thomas Sweeney, in the driveway of her West Hollywood home and went into a coma. She never regained consciousness and died five days later. In a controversial court case, Sweeney was convicted of voluntary manslaughter in Dunne's death and served three and a half years in prison. Dunne was 22 years old when she died.
 

Doctor Omega

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Why The Set Of Poltergeist Was Truly Cursed


Poltergeist was one of the most storied productions in Hollywood history. In fact, it's often called the most cursed film set of all time because of what happened to so many of its stars after the movie hit theaters. But even during the making of the now-classic movie, there were enough real-life scares to justify that reputation. Let's take a look at some of the freakiest things that happened behind the scenes of this haunted house favorite...

 
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